Golden Globe: Top three to Cape Horn

Published on January 1st, 2023

(January 1, 2023) – Along the 2022-23 Golden Globe Race course are several mandatory media stops, with the leaders having fulfilled the requirement along the southern tip of Hobart, Australia. Entrants must sail over a line and pause for 90 minutes for interviews and to drop off film and letters.

Simon Curwen (GBR) rounded the southern tip of New Zealand today with Kirsten Neuschäfer (RSA) 300 miles astern. He was first at the Hobart Gate on December 24 at 12:06 local time (0106 UTC) on his Biscay 36, followed by Neuschäfer 29.5 hours later.

Neuschäfer, however, has a time compensation of 35 hours for the rescue of Tapio Lehtinen (FIN) in November. Her time compensation actually puts her on the lead by 5.5 hours at the Hobart Gate. Abhilash Tomy (IND) followed the leaders in third.

“If there is one thing I know, it’s that all are still a long way from Les Sables d’Olonne and anything can happen,” said GGR Founder Don McIntyre. “BUT, this is exciting racing with three different boats, three top sailors and all now in the same weather system and all hungry to be first.”

Sail GP

The leading trio has now sailed over 50% of the course. Simon, the undisputed leader of the fleet from Cape Finisterre, has been consistently sailing the shortest route, with an efficient risk/benefit assessment for every move and routing choice. Kirsten’s ambitious routing options have not always paid off, particularly in the Atlantic but enabled her to come within reach on the Cape Town approaches, and in the lead when passing through Tasmania.

Curwen’s shrewd sailing strategy enabled him to build a comfortable 700-miles lead over the rest of the fleet while passing Cape Leeuwin. However, a faulty HF radio installation is restricting his access to weather information and communications. He is not receiving the weather faxes that Neuschäfer has and cannot talk to other entrants who are sharing weather information.

Additionally, he can not reach Peter Mott in New Zealand, a Private Maritime Radio service offering GGR entrants weather bulletins and passing Happy New Year Messages to family. This service from Passage Guardian would come in handy in the weeks ahead with reception expected all the way to Cape Horn.

Tomy had the weather on his side while sailing a superb run into Hobart, taking nearly 600 miles out of both leaders in just one week – before getting stuck in a windless bubble himself. He finally crossed the gate on December 27 at 17:48 local time (0648 UTC).

He described a close call, waking suddenly from a dream to find he was headed straight for cliffs just 500 metres away. He also experienced a HUGE physical and psychological boost once he sailed past the site of his 2018 GGR accident where he lost his boat and was severely injured. He spent the night in Storm Bay at anchor, waiting for more favorable winds, sleep and to do some maintenance before heading out towards Cape Horn.

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Credit for helping with rescue of Tapio Lehtinen:
• Kirsten Neuschäfer: 35 hours + 30 litres of fuel
• Abhilash Tomy: 12hrs

2022 GGR Class:
Abhilash Tomy (43) / India / Rustler 36
Ertan Beskardes (60) / UK / Rustler 36
Ian Herbert Jones (52) / UK / Tradewind 35
Jeremy Bagshaw (59) / South Africa / OE32
Kirsten Neuschäfer (39) / South Africa / Cape George 36
Michael Guggenberger (44) / Austria / Biscay 36
Simon Curwen (63) / UK / Biscay 36

2022 GGR Chichester Class:*
Guy Waites (54) / UK / Tradewind 35 (stopped in Cape Town to clean/paint hull)
* Competitors shift to this class by making one stop.

Retired
Edward Walentynowicz (68) / Canada / Rustler 36 (dropped out, Sept. 8)
Guy deBoer (66) / USA / Tashiba 36 (ran aground, Sept. 16)
Mark Sinclair (63) / Australia / Lello 34 (retired in Lanzarote, Sept. 22)
Pat Lawless (66) / Ireland / Saga 36 (retired in Cape Town, Nov. 9)
Damien Guillou (39) / France / Rustler 36 (retired in Cape Town, Nov. 14)
Tapio Lehtinen (64) / Finland / Gaia 36 Masthead sloop (sank off Cape Town, Nov. 18)
Arnaud Gaist (50) / France / BARBICAN 33 MKII-long keel version (retired near Saint Helena, Dec. 9)
Elliott Smith (27) / USA / Gale Force 34 (retired, Dec. 20)

About the 2022 Golden Globe Race
On September 4, 2022, the third edition of the Golden Globe Race started from Les Sables d’Olonne, France. Sixteen skippers will face eight months of isolation sailing 30,000 miles before finishing in Les Sables d’Olonne. Along the route there are several marks of the course and media requirements.

In 1968, while man was preparing to take his first steps on the moon, a mild mannered and modest young man was setting out on his own record breaking voyage of discovery. He had entered the original Golden Globe. Nine men started that first solo non-stop sailing race around the World. Only one finished. He was 29 year old Sir Robin Knox Johnston. History was made. Navigating only with a sextant, paper charts and an accurate and reliable time piece, Sir Robin navigated around the world.

In 2018, to celebrate 50 years since that first record breaking achievement, the Golden Globe Race was resurrected. It instantly gained traction with adventurers, captivated by the spirit and opportunity. Eighteen started with five finishers.

To embrace the original race, competitors must sail in production boats between 32 and 36 feet overall and designed prior to 1988 that have a full-length keel with rudder attached to their trailing edge. Additionally, sailors have limited communication equipment and can use only sextants, paper charts, wind up clocks, and cassette tapes for music.

Source: GGR

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