Scuttlebutt Sailing Club Library

Here is a collection of sailing books that the ‘Buttheads have strongly recommended, with comments some have shared. Let me know if you have a sailing book that you would like to contribute to the “Club Library.” Click on any book title for story and purchase information from Amazon.com or Abebooks.com.

Book of the Month
Sex, Lies & Spinnakers by Steve Van Slyke
Novice sailors Vivian and Mitch Sanford are on the adventure of a lifetime with their longtime friends experienced cruisers Jill and Henry Fullerton, sailing their two boats down the U.S. West Coast to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and on to the Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia. When Jill and Henry are murdered in Puerto Vallarta the evidence points to robbery and a pair of Mexican fishermen. While the fishermen await trial, sailboats are allowed to leave for foreign ports. Too late a missing journal convinces Mitch the fishermen are innocent. The real murderer is sailing away to paradise. He and Vivian have a decision to make: are they capable of crossing the Pacific Ocean and bringing their friends’ killer to justice? This sexy, action-packed sea adventure takes you on a roller coaster ride that never lets up. Learn more.

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z


  • A Sea of Words: A Lexicon and Companion for Patrick O’Brian’s Seafaring Tales by Dean King.Submitted by Ned Hall: “(This) helps explain the words that are very much of that period -“tie-wig”?, “flog the glass”?, as examples. Knowing these might add to the understanding, if not ones greater pleasure of these richly-crafted novels.”
  • A Tradition of Victory by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #14 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Across The Western Ocean by Bill Snaith . Submitted by Eric Camiel: “An account of a Trans Atlantic Race and a Trans Atlantic delivery. He writes beautifully and with passion. On local races, while we kids barely held on, Bill had the energy to spend his 4 to 8 off watch writing in his bunk. It’s striking how different things were then compared to this years Trans Atlantic. We forget that they didn’t know with any precision where they were much of the time, got minimal weather forecasts, had no radar and no modern clothes. It was a whole different game.”
  • Adrift by Steven Callahan. Submitted by JJ Isler: “Just have a bottle of water handy because his story makes you really thirsty.”
  • Adrift by Tristan Jones. Submitted by Cam Lewis
  • After the Storm by John Rousmaniere. Submitted by Charles J. Doane: “It is an incredibly well researched exploration of storms at sea and their impact on sailors and human society that eschews the sensational and focuses instead on much more profound issues.”
  • Airborne by William F. Buckley. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”
  • All This and Sailing, Too: An Autobiograph by Olin J. Stephens. Submitted by Jon Guth: “This is a charming and insightful autobiography by the living legend of 20th century yacht design. It is beautifully produced with many glorious photographs and illustrations.”
  • Always a Distant Anchorage by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “A number of people have written about sailing around the world, but few writers capture the essence of this wonderful experience as well as Hal Roth. He has a keen ability to observe people and places, and Roth’s fine writing illuminates his worldview as he guides you at sea and ashore. Reading this book, along with his new book ‘How to Sail Around the World,’ will show you why Hal and Margaret Roth are an inspiration to many of us who plan to sail over the next horizon.”
  • Around the World in 79 Days by Cam Lewis and Michael Levitt. Submitted by Thomas Newcomb: “About the first successful Trophée Jules Verne sail that takes you around the world in less than 80 days with the author and crew. This book is one of the great adventure stories of our time.”
  • Atlantic High by William F. Buckley. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”

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  • Before the Wind: The Memoir of an American Sea Captain by Charles Tyng (Viking). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Memoir of life at sea from 1808 to 1833 by an engaging writer who shipped out as a 13 year old boy and went on to become Captain and owner of ships that sailed around the world. Fascinating accounts of adventures including several in which the author cheated death by wits or luck.”
  • Berserk – My Voyage to the Antarctic in a Twenty-Seven-Foot Sailboat by David Mercy.Submitted by the Curmudgeon: “The single word ‘powerful’ seems like the most appropriate way to describe Mercy’s new sailing-adventure book. The title tells you what the book is all about, but it can not possibly convey the excitement or the gripping drama of this true story. It’s a fascinating tale told by a gifted taleteller. This book is definitely not about sailboat racing, but anyone who has ever sailed – and those who have not – will become quickly immersed in this fast paced adventure story. “
  • Beyond the Reef by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #19 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Blood Orange by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Blood Knot by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Blue at the Mizzen by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the twentieth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Boats with an Open Mind by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Bottoms Up! by Robert McKenna. Submitted by Scuttlebutt: “We occassionally get books sent to us, and some we even read. While we haven’t read this one yet from stem to stern, we do enjoy flipping through the pages. One has to worry about McKenna, who must have sat on many a bar stool to have collected such info. If you enjoy a cocktail, and can read at the same time, this books for you. Heck, even if you don’t read, ‘Bottoms Up!’ looks great on the bar.”
  • Broadsides: The Age of Fighting Sail, 1775-1815 by Nathan Miller. Submitted by Alan Montro: “One of the book’s most memorable scenes is the day when Nelson first went on board a warship at the age of 12. As Miller tells of the rousing battles to follow, they are not just scattered outbursts of action around the world; each takes on strategic meaning in relation to the others. This book is much better written than the typical history. Miller was a World War II sailor and has written a series of other naval histories; he knows both the subject and the lingo. His fluent narrative is founded on solid research. I recommend it as a companion volume to the works of O’Brian and C.S. Forester. It fully deserves five stars. “
  • BT Global Challenge: The World’s Toughest Yacht Race by Betsy Crowfoot and Manley Hopkinson. Submitted by Zulu Mama: “Spectacular photos by Mark Pepper & various onboard photographers punctuate the story of ‘The World’s Toughest Yacht Race’ – the 2000/01 BT Global Challenge. Follow 12 teams around the world ‘the wrong way’ through tropics and tempests.”

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  • Cape Horn by Felix Riesenberg. Submitted by Robert Johnston: “The history of the Cape Horn region, including the Straits of Magellan, from the days of the first discovers, through the glorious age of sail, to the present time; recounting the exploits of Magellan, Drake, Schouten, Fitzroy, Darwin, Melville, and many others, including the author’s own experiences. A Lord of the Rings of sailing books.”
  • Cape Horn: The Logical Route by Bernard Moitessier. Submitted by Andrew Bray: “Any sailing library would be incomplete without (this) classic.”
  • Captain from Connecticut by C.S. Forester. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller
  • Captain James Cook by Alan Villiers (Scribner’s). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “The definitive biography of perhaps the greatest maritime explorer by perhaps the last great square rigged Captain.”
  • Captain Nat Herreshoff: The Wizard of Bristol by Lewis Francis Herreshoff. Submitted by John Drayton: “Bio of arguably the most influential racing yacht designer ever.”
  • Championship Tactics by Gary Jobson. Submitted by R.J. Lewy: “The best book on tactics with personal anecdotes from Gary and his racing experiences.”
  • Chapman Piloting and Seamanship by Elbert S. Maloney. Submitted by Irv Heller: “A must have for any rag hauler or stink potter. THE BIBLE! This book was a faithful companion in my youth, and was, in large part, responsible for me eventually becoming a licensed Captain. First time sailor to seasoned salt. Rowboat to large motor yacht. Navigation, anchoring, knots, safety at sea…this is the most complete and comprehensive boating instruction book I have ever seen. Don’t leave port without it!”
  • Chasing the Long Rainbow: The Drama of a Singlehanded Sailing Race Around the World by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “Before the advent of the extreme ocean racers, such as the Open 60 class, single-handed around-the-world races were sailed in yachts which were not too different from those sailed by ‘ordinary sailors.’ In 1986 Roth sailed his 50 ft. yacht American Flag from Newport to Newport in the BOC single-handed ‘round the world race. Roth’s story is an exciting tale of his personal challenges and that of others in this daunting race. His vivid writing puts you aboard in calms and the storms of the Southern Ocean, and you will share the roller coaster of emotions experienced by lone sailors in this extreme environment. You don’t have to sail or know about yacht racing to enjoy this exciting book, but if you do sail, you’ll learn much by going along on Roth’s thrilling adventure. (To see how single-handed yacht racing has changed after only 15 years, read Ellen MacArthur’s Taking on the World.)”
  • Close to the Wind by Pete Goss. Submitted by RFH: “Retells Pete’s experience in the 1996-97 Vendee Globe, including a detailed account of his rescue, after a 160 mile beat to windward in hurricane force winds, of Raphael Dinelli from his life raft adrift in the Southern Ocean. The book is well written, a story of seamanship, heroism, and a sailor’s passion for the open ocean. After reading it, I was left wondering what Goss Challenges might have accomplished had their radical, ill-fated Adrian Thompson-designed catamaran been able to compete in The Race or campaign for the Jules Verne trophy (this book was previously brought to my attention in a 2002 edition of Scuttlebutt).”
  • Cochrane : Britannia’s last sea-king by Donald Thomas. Submitted by Bruce Kirby: “Capt. Thomas Cochrane was this most extraordinary seaman, whose arch enemy Napoleon described as the Sea Wolf, and ‘the greatest fighting sea captain.’ If you liked the Russell Crowe movie or the O’Brian novels, you will love these biographies of The Real Man.”
  • Cochrane: The Life and Exploits of a Fighting Captain by Robert Harvey. Submitted by Bruce Kirby: “Capt. Thomas Cochrane was this most extraordinary seaman, whose arch enemy Napoleon described as the Sea Wolf, and ‘the greatest fighting sea captain.’ If you liked the Russell Crowe movie or the O’Brian novels, you will love these biographies of The Real Man.”
  • Colours Aloft by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #16 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Command a King’s Ship by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #6 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Cross of St. George by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #22 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Cruising At Last: Sailing the East Coast by Elliott Merrick (Lyons Press, 2003). Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “A wonderful old-fashioned coastal cruising book. No great storms here, just a passionate, articulate, wry sailor in a small boat, demonstrating the transforming art of living aboard a boat and visiting interesting places.”

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  • Dead Reckoning by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Deadeye by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Death Roll by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Desolation Island by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fifth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Different Boats by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Dinghy Team Racing by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading (also see “Sail, Race and Win” and “Start to Win”).”
  • Doctor Dogbody’s Leg (Heart of Oak Sea Classics Series) by James Norman Hall. Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “Part of a series called Heart of Oak Sea Series. One of the funniest and most enjoyable books I’ve read in a while. Very entertaining story of how the good doctor lost his leg. Actually, he tells about 8 different stories to a bunch of guys sitting around in a pub.”
  • Dove by Robin Lee Graham. Submitted by Tim Kent: “This tale of a young boy who sailed around the world alone predates Tania Aebi’s feat by more than thirty years (see Tania’s book, ‘Maiden Voyage’). In the days before GPS and satellite communication, this amazing adventure story fueled my early desire to sail solo around the world. Great reading for young adult and armchair sailor alike.”
  • Down Channel by R. T. McMullen. Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “A pioneer cruising book when first published in 1869 and remains enthralling and instructive to this day. Full of adventure and eccentricity, this classic is the record of vigorous voyages by a man who took keen pleasure in meeting challenges with what he called ‘my hard sailing habits.’ He enjoyed discomfort. Nobody summarized the pastime better than McMullen when he observed that cruising under sail is like ‘successfully gathering roses off thorns.’”
  • Down to the Sea: The Fishing Schooners of Gloucester by Joseph Garland. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “An account of the Schoonermen of Glochester.They lost nearly 700 vessels and 4,000 men in the 60 years that were their prime.”

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  • Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing. Submitted by Bruce Gresham: “It is far and away the best sailing adventure I have every read. The greatest survival story of all time. Every bit of it true. The highlight is the description of the sail of the James Caird, a converted 22-foot work boat by three men across 1,200 miles of the Southern Ocean.”
  • Enemy in Sight by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #10 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”

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  • Falmouth for orders; the story of the last clipper ship race around Cape Horn by Alan Villiers.Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Accounts of life on the Windjammers in the last days of sail.”
  • Fastnet, Force 10: The Deadliest Storm in the History of Modern Sailing by John Rousmaniere.Submitted by JJ Isler
  • Fatal Storm by Rob Mundle. Submitted by the Alun James: Excerpt from Amazon.com: In 1998, the 115 boats jockeying at the starting line for the annual Sydney-to-Hobart Race had been warned that low-pressure weather systems were conspiring to guarantee a wild and chancy race. Yet few sailors anticipated the ferocity of the storm that descended around two o’clock the next morning, which quickly devolved into the worst sailing disaster in recent memory. Mundle skillfully re-creates from firsthand accounts the stories of bravery, luck, and folly that left a handful of sailors convinced they’d never go near the Hobart again.
  • Fifty South To Fifty South by Warwick M. Tompkins. Submitted by Dave Ellis: “The account of the Wander Bird’s sojourn around Cape Horn in 1936.”
  • Fighting Finish: The Volvo Ocean Race: Round the World 2001-2002 by Gary Jobson. Submitted by R.J. Lewy: “This book not only won the ‘best sports book of 2002’ but it is a fantastic ‘coffee table’ book with the best photos details of the last Volvo Ocean Race (2001-2002).”
  • First You Have to Row a Little Boat: Reflections On Life and Living by Richard Bode. Submitted by John McNeill: “This little volume, still readily available at most book sources for about $10-12, is a wonderful blend of one mans youthful development of love for the sport, and the life lessons that came from that experience. If you know sailing as an avocation, or want to introduce someone to the love of the sport, this is THE book to provide. It is a delightful quick read and will actually fit in some larger Christmas stockings.”
  • Five Hundred Sailing Records of American Built Ships by Carl C. Cutler. Submitted by Cam Lewis: “Any book on sailing records by Carl C. Cutler makes for some interesting reading. Gives some perspective to the chases in Master and Commander.”
  • For My Country’s Freedom by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #21 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Form Line of Battle by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #9 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • 1421: The Year China Discovered America by Gavin Menzies. Submitted by Bruce McPherson: “Captain Menzies is an extremely intelligent and intuitive retired Royal Navy submarine skipper with a serious bent for the history of charting and navigation. This very readable book covers the author’s piecing together the worldwide explorations of Chinese “Treasure Fleets of 1421-1423. The depth and insight illustrated herein are nothing short of mind boggling: start with the fact that Columbus used Chinese data when he ‘rediscovered’ America!”

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  • Godforsaken Sea : The True Story of a Race Through the World’s Most Dangerous Waters by Derek Lundy. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • Governor Ramage RN by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #4 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Lieutenant Lord Ramage, in command of the Triton Brig, is escorting a convoy from Barbados to Jamaica, normally a routine and tedious chore. But this time Ramage has to be especially vigilant to guard the convoy’s precious cargo-a family of important French refugees. With the dreaded Admiral Goddard threatening a continued vendetta against him, Ramage must not fail.”
  • Greyhounds of the Sea: The Story of the American Clipper Ship by Carl C. Cutler. Submitted by Cam Lewis: “Any book on sailing records by Carl C. Cutler makes for some interesting reading. Gives some perspective to the chases in Master and Commander.”
  • Gypsy Moth Circles the World by Sir Francis Chichester. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”

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  • Heart of Glass: Fiberglass Boats and the Men Who Built Them by Daniel Spurr. Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “If you want to know the amazing story of how pleasure boating got to where it is now, start with Heart of Glass. Dan Spurr tells how, beginning in the 1940s, fiberglass replaced oak as the structural core of a modern sailing vessel. In 137 handsomely written profiles of the men and companies that produced the Hobies, Tartans, Pearsons, C&Cs, and the J classes (among many other boats), he explains how this revolution came about in a business whose finances usually were as ramshackle as the building sheds. You may well find your boat here. You’ll surely be entertained by Spurr’s stories of explosive experiments with volatile materials and big egos.”
  • Heavy Weather Sailing by K. Adlard Coles. Submitted by David Norris
  • High Latitude, North Atlantic: 30,000 Miles Through Cold Seas And History by John R. Bockstoce. Submitted by Rob Honecks: “Arctic scholar and voyager John Bockstoce recounts 10 passages he made into northern latitudes during the 1990s in his sturdy motor-sailer Belvedere. From Svalbard, north of Norway, to Scotland and the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and Labrador –as well as a trip through the Northwest Passage with William Simon– Bockstoce and his crews tracked the courses of Norse voyagers, Irish monks, English and Dutch whalers, Inuit hunters, European explorers, and German submariners in this account of human activity and natural phenomena in the frozen North.”
  • High Performance Sailing by Frank Bethwaite. Submitted by Doug Petter: “The most comprehensive book around about the relationship between meteorology and sailing. Not for the beginning sailor, however, as there is a vast amount of technical information. If you really know your stuff you might push through it in a few weeks. A must-have reference book for the serious sailor.”
  • H.M.S. Surprise by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the third of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Honour this Day by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #17 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • How to Sail Around the World : Advice and Ideas for Voyaging Under Sail by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “Hal Roth’s most recent book (2004) is an excellent addition to the list of ‘how-to’ books about long-range cruising under sail. I believe that this book is the best reference now available for prospective and current sailors who wish to expand their horizons. Studying the carefully-researched information and advice tested during Roth’s more than 200,000 sea miles will help the reader make sensible, safe, and economical decisions for all aspects of the cruising life. This well-written book has many photographs and drawings to enhance the detailed text. A good companion book to this one is Roth’s ‘Always a Distant Anchorage.’ Read these two books and you will be ready to cut the dock lines.”

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  • Icebergs, Port and Starboard: The Whitbread Round the World Race by John R. Jourdane.Submitted by G.G. Thompson: “A really ‘down to earth’ description of the Whitbread Round the World Race. John, an American, describes what it was like preparing for and racing around the world with a boatload of New Zealanders on Fisher & Paykel, New Zealand. You get a real feel for the race (now known as the Volvo Ocean Race).”
  • Illustrated Sail & Rig Tuning by Ivar Dedekam. Submitted by John Flato: “This is my favorite book on sail trim. It not only explains what to do, but why to do it. It is organized well and has great illustations. It is not just for novices, but has information that more experienced sailors will find useful. “
  • In Gallant Company by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #3 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex by Nathaniel Philbrick. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “This is the story that inspired Herman Melvilles’s Moby Dick.”
  • In Peril: A Daring Decision, A Captain’s Resolve, and the Salvage that Made History by Twain Braden, Skip Strong. Submitted by Win Fowler: “Not a sailing book but a great tale of courage and seamanship.”
  • In the Wake of Bass and Flinders by Bern Cuthbertson. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “Gives a new meaning to building and voyaging a historic replica.”
  • Inspiring Leadership: Staying Afloat in Turbulent Times by Jane Cranwell-Ward. Submitted by Pascal Desmarets: “Using the unique case study of the BT Global Challenge 2000/1, round the world yacht race, the authors tracked the 12 skippers and studied their behavior as they led their teams. The book provides an in-depth understanding of what makes a high performing leader and how to sustain competitive advantage. The study has revealed that the key to exceptional performance is the ability to use Emotional Intelligence and to combine ‘driving’ and ‘enabling’ leadership behavior.”

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  • Last of the Wind Ships by Alan Villars. Submitted by Dan Nerney: “This coffee table book is filled with beautiful black and white photos by Alan Villiers with extracts from several of his books as captions to the remarkable photos taken aboard the last of the great full rigged sailing ships. Villiers, born in Australia in 1903, carried a camera and pen (but no typewriter) in his sea bag when he sailed as a deckhand on some of the worlds most famous sailing ships in the 20s and 30s – the Cape Horners, Herzogen Cecile, Grace Harwar and Parma. He went to sea at 15 but his career ended several years later when he was severely injured aboard one of these ships. He then turned to writing and authored the book “By Way of Cape Horn” and “To Falmouth for Orders” As a photographer, he was unique – a forefather to today’s marine photographers, He made films and was with Dr Basil Greenhill (who wrote the introductory text), one of the founders of photographic archive of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England. It is easy to romanticize about going to sea in the early 20th century but the photos in this book show the difficult life of the seamen and women (usually only Captain’s wives) aboard these ships which ended with the sinking of the Killoran in 1940 by a Nazi U-boat.”
  • Life and Times of Horatio Hornblower by C.N. Parkinson. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller
  • Living Every Second by Tracy Edwards. Submitted by Susan Johnson: “Against unimaginable odds, Tracy Edwards captained the first all-woman crew to victory in the Whitbread Round-the-World Cup in 1989. Her autobiography takes the reader through her Whitbread victory and her attempt at the Jules Verne Trophy in 1998. Her personal life is also examined.”
  • Longboat To Hawaii by Alexander Crosby Brown (Cornell Maritime Press). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Compiled from the journals of the Captain and two passengers on the Clipper Ship Hornet bound from New York to San Francisco in 1866 which was destroyed by fire in the Pacific. The journals contain the observations of the cruise as seen from three different perspectives, then the accounts of the subsequent voyage of one of the ship’s longboats with 15 survivors to the island of Hawaii – 4000 miles in 43 days on 10 days’ provisions. Concludes with interviews of the survivors by Mark Twain who was then in Hawaii.”
  • Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time by Dava Sobel. Submitted by Jack Griffin

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  • Maiden Voyage by Tania Aebi. Submitted by Tim Kent: “A wonderful story of a young girl blessed with the family and the spirit of adventure that prompted a solo circumnavigation remarkable for its success and the tenacity of the young woman who made it. This story is both a sailing story and a voyage of discovery – as are all good sailing stories. My young daughters and I enjoyed it equally.”
  • Man of War by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the last of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Mariners are Warned! by Marsden Horden. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “The Royal Hydrographic Office at it’s best so next time you use a chart just check the date of the surveys.”
  • Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the first of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Maxi – The Ultimate Racing Experience by Preben Nyeland. Submitted by Benny Nelson: “Describes the structure of the world’s biggest racing yachts, looks at thirty top maxi boats, describes their short- and long-distance races, and provides a behind-the-scenes tour of life among their crew. “
  • Midshipman Bolitho by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the first of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Moby Dick, or the White Whale by Herman Melville. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “Truly one of the greatest books of all time.”
  • Muskrat: A Surprise Bid For The America’s Cup by Douglas Hanks. Submitted by Kip Wiley: “A tongue in cheek look at an alternative attempt to win the Cup. Sounds almost possible/plausible with all the shenanigans of modern day ‘Cupping’.”
  • My First Picture Book of Boating Words by Nicholas Agro. Submitted by Nicholas Agro: “This unique picture book is designed to teach young children about boating words. It includes sailing and other boating terminology. Each page contains color photos of boating objects along with the name of each object beneath it. It’s a great way to introduce boating words to future sailors.”
  • My Old Man and the Sea: A Father and Son Sail Around Cape Horn by David Hayes and Daniel Hayes. Submitted by C. Kondracky: “An account of a father and son’s trip on their small boat around the horn. It was funny and touching and should be read by anyone who sails in Long Island Sound.”

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  • N by E by Rockwell Kent. Submitted by Patrick Broderick: “Artist, author, sailor Rockwell Kent’s account of an actual voyage to Greenland in a small boat, North-by-East across Davis Strait, of shipwreck, but with a happy ending. First published in 1930 and Illustrated with Kent’s wonderful woodblock prints. Worthy of a read (Kent illustrated other editions of “Moby Dick”, “The Canterbury Tales”, among many others).”
  • North to the Night by Alvah Simon. Submitted by Kurt Hoehne: “Story of how the author sailed North just about as far as you can go and wintered in the ice. One of those strangely captivating ‘why on earth would he do that’ reads — polar bears, blindness, existential philosophy, you name it.”
  • Northern Lights by Desmond Holdridge. Submitted by Charles J. Doane: “It is a beautifully written account of a very interesting, ultimately disastrous cruise to northernmost Labrador in a converted potato lugger in 1925.”

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  • Oceanography and Seamanship by William G. Van Dorn. Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “(commenting on a Scuttlebutt thread on rogue waves) Rogues don’t have to be immense 80-footers, just unusually high and nasty in comparison with the surrounding sea state. And there are plenty of them: in this text book, William G. Van Dorn estimated that one deep-water wave out of 20 is a rogue. One cause is a collision of nonparallel waves, some running at one angle due to the local wind, others running at another angle from a storm many miles beyond the horizon.”
  • Oliver’s Surprise by Carol Newman Cronin. Submitted by Nelson Weiderman: “What a delightful short tale provided as Carol Newman Cronin’s first offering! The publisher has dubbed this “Young Adult/Fiction”, but that is really unfair. This story and writing style is accessible to and appropriate for pre-teens, and the topic will also give pleasure to “old school” post-boomers. For our younger children it will be a revelation of what our world looked like about 70 years ago. For our oldsters it is a reminder of what the world was like without television, when manners prevailed, and when all t-shirts were white. I would recommend this book for “all readers”, and especially for those with an interest in boats, the seaside, or the memorable past.”
  • On The Wind’s Highway by Harold S.Vanderbilt. Submitted by Ned Hall: “When I was growing up, my brothers Eric, Ben and I read and re-read with fascination and hero worship. (It) is a wonderfully told and written perspective on the golden days of the America’s Cup. It has some beautiful pictures along with well-told stories of the races, boats and people, including our designer of the ages, Olin Stephens. Not to be missed is the story of Rod Stephens saving Ranger and his hairy ride to the masthead on another exciting day. It is sometimes nice to drop back to this period to give us some perspective on today’s America’s Cup Races and antics.”
  • On The Wind’s Way by Bill Snaith. Submitted by Morton Weintraub: “A recounting of a transatlantic race and much more. If any man deserved the sobriquet ‘renaissance man,’ it was Snaith. I envy anybody reading this wonderful book for the first time.”
  • One Watch at a Time: Around the World with Drum on the Whitbread Race by Skip Novak.
  • Overboard by Elizabeth Fama. Submitted by Manfred C. Schreiber, Germany: “Fantastic story with a lot of true elements and a finish which you won´t forget easily. DO NOT turn on the last page before reading the whole story. A must read for everyone who loves boats and dreams about the long trip.”

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  • Passage to Mutiny by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #7 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Post Captain by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the second of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”

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  • Racing, Cruising and Design by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Racing Through Paradise: A Pacific Passage by William F. Buckley. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”
  • Ramage by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the first of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, the young lieutenant takes up special orders direct from Nelson himself which bring news of a mission close to his own heart. In a daring foray, under the very nose of the French Mediterranean fleet, Ramage is to sail his tiny cutter close in to the Italian shore and rescue a party of stranded aristocrats from Napoleon’s fast-advancing army.”
  • Ramage & the Dido by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the last of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Captain Lord Ramage has only just arrived home when he receives new orders: he is to commission and take command of the Dido, a massive seventy-four-gun ship! Accompanied by the courageous crew of the Calypso, Ramage is bound for the West Indies, where he must face the challenges of commanding such a massive weapon of war.”
  • Ramage & the Drumbeat by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #2 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Lieutenant Lord Ramage is ordered to proceed to Gibraltar-with all possible dispatch-aboard His Majesty’s ship Kathleen, to support Nelson in a battle with the Spanish off Cape Trafalgar.”
  • Ramage & the Freebooters by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #3 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage, is given command of the Triton with orders to deliver a warning to three offshore fleets that the fleet in homeport has mutinied. His first job is to get the Triton under way and he comes up with a surprise to get the mutinous Triton’s out of port. Even then he still has to hold the crew together and build their loyalty. Then upon arriving in the West Indies, he is given a mission and set up by his admiral to take a fall and must gamble against the odds to be successful.”
  • Ramage & the Guillotine by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #6 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, just across the English Channel, Napoleon’s seemingly invincible army has massed in a great invasion flotilla. England’s sea forces, under Lord Admiral Nelson, are all but paralyzed-not knowing the size, strength, or time of the foreign onslaught. In a brilliant yet daring spy scheme to protect Britain’s shores, Lieutenant Lord Nicholas Ramage is chosen to plumb the secrets of the French High Command. The penalty for failure is the guillotine.”
  • Ramage & the Rebels by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #9 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, there is a sinking British ship, her crew and passengers, men and women alike, ruthlessly murdered at the hands of a French privateer. . . . This is the nightmare Ramage and the crew of the Calypso stumble upon while engaged in a sweep for freebooters in the waters off Jamaica. Supported by his men in a thirst for righteous vengeance, Ramage sets sail to bring the murderers to justice.”
  • Ramage & the Renegades by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #12 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, with the Treaty of Amiens signed, hostilities have ceased – at least on paper. Nelson’s crews are standing down and Ramage is on leave when he receives covert Admiralty orders to inspect the small island of Trinidade off the coast of Brazil. Reaching South American shores, Ramage and the crew of the Calypso fetch up in a battle to free several captive merchant ships – and a beautiful woman passenger – as they cross swords with bloodthirsty pirates.”
  • Ramage & the Saracens by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #17 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage and the Calypso are ordered to Naples after the battle of Trafalgar and given fresh orders. The Barbary Coast pirates – the Saracens – are active in Sicily again, and terrorizing fishing ports. Ramage and his crew are sent to Sicily to track done the Saracins before they can attack another town.”
  • Ramage at Trafalgar by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #16 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage is finally reunited with his beloved Sarah and hopes to spend at least a few quiet weeks with her. Instead, Ramage is summoned by Admiral Nelson himself and sent to join the British fleet in blockade duty off Cadiz. His orders: to join Nelson’s fleet blockading the combined French and Spanish navies in the port of Cadiz. However, Nelson does not plan on merely sitting idly by, blockading the enemy’s fleet. He intends to confront it head-on in the biggest naval battle the world has ever seen.”
  • Ramage’s Challenge by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #15 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Captain Lord Ramage is faced with new orders returning him to the Mediterranean, the site of his first command. Since the outbreak of fresh hostilities between Britain and France, Admiralty spies have been hunting for British officers and allies trapped on the mainland, among them Ramage’s first love, Gianna, the Marchesa di Volterra. Still grieving over the disappearance of his wife, Sarah, Ramage must lead the daring crew of the Calypso into enemy waters, venture deep inland where Napoleon’s invincible armies wait, locate the hostages, and – against all odds – bring them to safety!”
  • Ramage’s Devil by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #13 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, while on holiday, ashore with his new wife at a chateau in France, Captain Lord Ramage finds the honeymoon interrupted by an end to the Peace of Amiens – and a return to war which will last over a decade. Finding themselves on unfriendly soil just hours before hostilities commence, Ramage and Sarah elude the grasp of Napoleon’s secret police, seeking to close upon all the Brits and French Royalists they can find. Even as they escape, their host is captured and deported to the notorious penal colony on Devil’s Island. Ultimately, back at the helm of the Calypso and among old friends, Ramage finds himself heading in the same direction. But given the Island’s impregnable reputation, can he pull off a rescue?”
  • Ramage’s Diamond by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #7 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, as the youngest captain in His Majesty’s Navy, with a reputation for landing impossible assignments, Lord Ramage is dispatched to the Caribbean islands of Martinique and Diamond Rock. The mission seems humdrum: barricade the French within Fort Royal. But sent to sea in the Juno with a crew grown restless and undisciplined under the prior command of a drunk, Ramage realizes his vessel may not be up to battle with the French.”
  • Ramage’s Mutiny by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #8 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, the vicious mutineers aboard the British ship Jocasta had surrendered their vessel to Spain. Sailing aboard the frigate Calypso, Captain Lord Ramage receives Admiralty orders to recover her by any means. The Jocasta is held in the heavily fortified Spanish port of Santa Cruz, but Ramage will stop at nothing to defy the odds and cut out the imprisoned vessel-even if it means inciting another ‘mutiny’ on board his own ship.”
  • Ramage’s Prize by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #5 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, the West Indian bases are desperate: Post vessels-a vital communications link between England and the West Indies in the war against France-are mysteriously disappearing and no packets have arrived with orders in months. Were the privateers out in full force again? Had Napoleon’s navy a secret new weapon? Lieutenant Lord Nicholas Ramage sets out from Jamaica to discover what treachery is threatening to throw the British navy into chaos. But what he finds is totally unexpected . . ..”
  • Ramage’s Signal by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #11 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage’s Signal follows the crew of the Calypso further into the French-dominated waters of the Mediterranean on Admiralty orders to sink, burn and destroy. Aiming to confuse and distract the enemy, Ramage and his men find themselves isolated and outnumbered as they take on the might of Napoleon’s fleet.”
  • Ramage’s Trial by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #14 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, a convoy back to England and its plodding operations overseen by Ramage is torn by a bizarre meet with another British frigate. Although newly married, Ramage struggles with an infatuation with a lady of the convoy. After a case of mutiny, Ramage is court martialed for his life, with an infuriatingly biased judge guiding his fate. Throughout there overhangs the disturbing worry that Ramage’s bride (of the previous novel Ramage’s Devil) has been lost at sea.”
  • Recent Advances and Issues in Oceanography by C. Reid Nichols. Submitted by Nick Creilos: “This volume presents the people, technology, and discoveries that mark the highlights of oceanography. I found the first few chapters quite enlightening with regard to the current “state of the art” in ocean sciences. The additional chapters that describe the lives of prominent ocean scientists, organizations, references, web sites, and speeches will serve as an outstanding “ready reference” for those actually practicing ocean science as well as those working toward becoming ocean scientists. “
  • Relentless Pursuit by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #25 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Run to the Lee by Kenneth Brooks. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “A Chesapeake Bay winter story. If home water is Chesapeake Bay, it’s a must read.”

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  • Sail and Power by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Sail, Race and Win by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading. (also see “Dinghy Team Racing” and “Start to Win”).”
  • Sail Like a Champion by Dennis Conner and Michael Levitt. Submitted by Graham Kelly: “My nomination for best racing book for advanced sailors. This 1992 book combines a high level of sophistication with a clear and logical presentation of the relevant issues. Its a bit like an America’s Cup level text for those of us who aspire to sail at the highest possible level, but don’t have the time or opportunity to sail in an Around the World Race or America’s Cup, or the resources to hire professional crew.”
  • Sail, Race and Win by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading. (also see “Dinghy Team Racing” and “Start to Win”).”
  • Sailing Alone Around the World by Joshua Slocum. Submitted by JJ Isler
  • Sailing Theory and Practice by Czeslaw A. Marchaj. Submitted by Chris Allen: “A Scientific Analysis, with 335 Drawings and Photographs of the Aerodynamic, Hydrodynamic, and Other Design Factors which Define a Yatch’s Behavior”
  • Sailing Grace: A True Story of Death, Life, and the Sea by John Otterbacher. Submitted by Regan Weaver: “‘Sailing Grace’ is the author’s account of drowning in heart disease, fighting back to the surface, and sailing on. It begins with him flat on his back in a local health club and ends 31 months later and 4000 miles later when he and his family maneuver their sailboat, Grace, to Schull Harbor, Ireland. This book is much more than a simple recounting of travels or of heart problems. ‘Sailing Grace’ is a love story about a man and his family. It’s a tale of obstacles overcome and the determination to live life to the fullest even as he stares death in the eyes. Cardiac patients and anyone else affected by heart disease should read this book because it is a beautiful account of the bravery and courage that is necessary to forge on despite risk. And every sailor should read this book because it is also a well written blue water tale.”
  • Sailing, Seamanship and Yacht Construction by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Sailing Smart : Winning Techniques, Tactics, And Strategies by Buddy Melges and Charles Mason. Submitted by Doris Colgate: “Buddy Melges is so thorough, so clear, and so giving that any sailor who absorbs and applies his advice can’t help but win. He is witty, entertaining, and sincere in his desire to promote better sailors….It’s a book you can’t stop reading.”
  • Sailing to the Reefs by Bernard Moitessier. Submitted by Andrew Bray: “Any sailing library would be incomplete without (this) classic.”
  • Sailing With Scoundrels and Kings by John Jourdane. Submitted by Scuttlebutt: “After sailing over 300,000 miles, breaking masts in every ocean on earth, and competing on some of the hallmark boats and races in the sport, Jourdane narrates the experiences of his 45-year journey. Simple writing, almost log-style, keeps the reader to the facts, and allows the mind to wander and consider the life style he led. Fast, enjoyable read, and particularly a must for anyone who sailed with John (just to find out what he might have said about you.”
  • Sarah’s Boat: A Young Girl Learns the Art of Sailing by Douglas Alvord. Submitted by Deborah Abbott: “The line between fiction and nonfiction is blurred in this story about Sarah, who is taught to sail by her grandfather and perfects her skills enough to leap from a Puddleduck to a Bluejay sloop. With her grandfather, she sands, varnishes, and paints the Bluejay and then practices learning the ropes of the bigger boat. She enters the Labor Day race and beats several boys who have taken her for granted. This book is peculiar because the plot is predictable and the characters somewhat stereotyped; yet the sailing information, glossary, and drawings are exceptionally good. Readers of fiction may be turned off by the picture-book format, but young sailors will peruse this volume with interest. Color and black pencil sketches accompany the text, but it is the precise sailing drawings that will catch the eye. Recommended for young would-be sailors.”
  • Sea of Glory by Nat Philbrick. Submitted by Tad Gillespie: “In this new work, Nat Philbrick charts the 1838 – 1842 exploration of the Pacific Ocean by the United States South Seas Exploring Expedition. Headed by the controversial Charles Wilkes and consisting of six sailing vessels and 346 men, it represented one of the largest voyages of discovery in the history of the Western world. The Expedition’s scientists brought back more specimens and artifacts than all three of James Cook’s voyages combined, including 2,000 new species that would become the foundation of the scientific collections of the Smithsonian Institution. Nat relates what happened on the voyage of the Expedition, what went wrong, and why many of us have never heard of this epic voyage and tale. It is a remarkable story – even more so because it has been forgotten for so long.”
  • Sea Hunter: A Novel of Suspense by Paul Garrison. Submitted by the Curmudgeon: “With his electrifying fast-paced thrillers, Paul Garrison has firmly established himself as the premiere author of contemporary high seas adventure. In Sea Hunter, a multihull charter captain takes on his last charter of the Caribbean season for what started as a filming a project, but things changed when they encountered a towering high tech Windjammer that was not the harmless research vessel it purports to be. Lots of intrigue, plenty of suspense, the US Navy is involved and there is even a bit of boy/ girl to complete the formula. And it all takes place on a 45-foot catamaran. A quick read that any sailor will enjoy.”
  • Seaworthiness: The Forgotten Factor by Czeslaw A. Marchaj. Submitted by Bruce Thompson: “Written in the aftermath of the 1979 Fastnet, it is a qualitative assessment of the factors influencing the seaworthiness of yachts. It is a wake up call to designers who are sacrificing safety for all out speed. While it is technical in nature, the last chapter alone is required reading for anyone who ventures offshore. It provides a clear basis for deciding on what storm survival tactics will work best based on the actual conditions present.”
  • Second to None by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #24 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Sex, Lies & Spinnakers by Steve Van Slyke. Submitted by Amazon: “Novice sailors Vivian and Mitch Sanford are on the adventure of a lifetime with their longtime friends experienced cruisers Jill and Henry Fullerton, sailing their two boats down the U.S. West Coast to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and on to the Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia. When Jill and Henry are murdered in Puerto Vallarta the evidence points to robbery and a pair of Mexican fishermen. While the fishermen await trial, sailboats are allowed to leave for foreign ports. Too late a missing journal convinces Mitch the fishermen are innocent. The real murderer is sailing away to paradise. He and Vivian have a decision to make: are they capable of crossing the Pacific Ocean and bringing their friends’ killer to justice? This sexy, action-packed sea adventure takes you on a roller coaster ride that never lets up.”
  • Signal-Close Action by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #12 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Sloop of War by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #4 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Small Boats by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Song of the Sirens by Earnest K. Gann. Submitted by Eric Zoehrer: “Great book chronicling unique experiences aboard past ‘sirens.'”
  • Sou’West & by West of Cape Cod by Llewellyn Howland. Submitted by Steve Howard: “(This book) brings us back to an era that many of us wish to have been a part, to a region of great renown in our sport, and to relationships with men of stature and understanding not often in evidence today. The chapter of the challenge race leaves you exhausted, cold and wet; those describing a proper clambake and Christmas celebration have you loosening your belt a couple of notches.”
  • South: A Memoir of the Endurance Voyage by Ernest Shackelton. Submitted by Bill Tripp: “The most remarkable true story of sailing and survival, told in grand matter of fact fashion by a man who lead a company of 26 men stranded in the Antarctic Ice Flow, as it first crushes their ship, and then breaks up. His story of fighting for them and leading them in open boats across the southern Ocean will resonate with anyone who has made a landfall or sailed through the worst. Stepping off the broken ice flow into open boats at 65 degrees S, and bringing 26 men home matches Odysseus’s journey, and it happened.”
  • Square Rigger Round the Horn; the Making of a Sailor by C. Ray Wilmore. Submitted by Ed Cesare: “It is the true story of Mr. Wilmore and chum’s signing on to a passage from Philadelphia to Honolulu in the latter but not depressingly latest days of sail.”
  • Stand into Danger by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #2 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Start to Win by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading. (also see “Dinghy Team Racing” and “Sail, Race and Win”).”
  • Steaming to Bamboola – The World of a Tramp Freighter by Christopher Buckley. Submitted by Anton Huggler
  • Storm and Silence by Joe Cannon. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “A hard cruising tale of a circumnavigation of the Tasman Sea from Tasmania to Fjiordland NZ to Norfolk Island and S.E Australia with plenty of hard won observations on small boat rough ocean voyaging.”
  • Success to the Brave by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #15 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Survive the Savage Sea by Dougal Robertson. Submitted by Jack Griffin: “True story of Dougal Roberston and his family in a dinghy in the Pacific for 37 days after their 43 foot schooner was attacked by killer whales and sank in 60 seconds. Turtle blood cocktail anyone?”
  • Surviving the Storm: Coastal and Offshore Tactics by Steve and Linda Dashew (Beowulf, Inc).Submitted by Bill Wheary: “A tremendous source of information for learning how to deal with severe weather, including sailing techniques, equipment, and boat preparedness. Contains dozens of interviews with sailors who experienced extreme weather. Far more information than offered in almost any safety at sea seminar and a must if planning to sail offshore.”
  • Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome. Submitted by Edward Fryer: “(Great) for children.”
  • Sword of Honour by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #23 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”

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  • Tall Ships Down by Daniel S. Parrott. Submitted by John Crawford
  • Tactics and Strategy in Yacht Racing by Joachim Schult. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “‘Sailing is more than just a hobby.’ says the preface. The book explores the vast number of tactics which every racing man can use, either to defend himself effectively or else to take full advantage of every opportunity he has to attack. Much like a book on chess openings, this book lays out the positions and the preferred tactics to be used in that position. Very good read.”
  • Taking on the World: A Sailor’s Extraordinary Solo Race Around the Globe by Ellen MacArthur.Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “The world of ocean racing is a marriage of engineering, sponsorship, skill, luck, individual determination and guts. Read Ellen MacArthur’s story of her early sailing experiences and her single-handed and crewed extreme sailing adventures and you will discover a woman of focus and skill who ‘takes on the world’ in a remarkable fashion. Ms. MacArthur shares her thoughts and emotions at all stages of her preparation and racing, and she gives enough technical information and detail to satisfy both novice and experienced sailors. After reading this exciting, personal saga, I found myself thinking ‘What had I done by age 25?’”
  • Temple to the Wind by Christopher Pastore. Submitted by Alex Arnold: “To the wealth of new books on Captain Nat one should add Christopher Pastore’s “Temple to the Wind.” Not only is this a brief biography of the great man but also a parallel look at Sir Thomas Lipton not to mention Iselin, Barr and Dunraven. The book culminates with Reliance: Shamrock III in 1903. The blow by blow accounts of the 1899, 1901 and 1903 matches are great. I found myself sitting there reading this book with all my coffee table A. C. books spread out around me.”
  • 10,000 Leagues Over The Sea by William Albert Robinson. Submitted by Bob Bailey: “His circumnavigation in the ’30s aboard his ‘Svaap.’ He is one of the few early small boat ocean pioneers.”
  • Ted Hood: Through Hand and Eye by Ted Hood and Michael Levitt. Submitted by G. Bruce Knecht: “Ted Hood built a 12-foot sailboat of his own design when he was just 15, and he has been doing pretty much the same thing ever since. Hundreds of his boats on the water today, and his sails on every America’s Cup defender from 1962 through 1977. Mr. Hood has long been known for letting his accomplishments do most of his talking, but now he has written this lavishly illustrated, large-format autobiography with Michael Levitt, the New York Yacht Club’s communications director.”
  • The America’s Cup: The History of Sailing’s Greatest Competition in the Twentieth Century by Dennis Conner and Michael Levitt. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • The Art of Coarse Cruising by Michael Green. Submitted by Edward Fryer: “(Among) the only truly funny books written about sailing.”
  • The Art of Coarse Sailing by Michael Green. Submitted by Edward Fryer: “(Among) the only truly funny books written about sailing.”
  • The Battle of the Atlantic by Andrew Williams. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float by Farley Mowat. Submitted by Scott Gordon: “A hilarious book about a certain time in Newfoundland. Unique, escapist and totally funny. Right there with Tristan Jones on the ‘could this really happen?’ scale.”
  • The Boy, Me, and the Cat by Henry Plummer. Submitted by Wells M. Pile: “A marvelous read about ‘cruising’ south on the intracoastal waterway in 1912-1913 in a 24′ cat boat. Reprinted a few years ago, the origonal edition was very small, mimeographed and bound with fishing line.”
  • The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “Everyone has had at least one Captain Queeg in their life.”
  • The Coast of Summer: Sailing New England Waters from Shelter Island to Cape Cod by Anthony Bailey. Submitted by Rick Perret: “A warm, well written book of Bailey’s annual summer cruises along New England coast from his home base in Stonington, CT – something he’s been doing each summer for nearly 30 years. He’s a great writer and its the perfect book for cold New England winters.”
  • The Commodore by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the seventeenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Common Sense of Yacht Design- 2 volumes (The Rudder) by L. Francis Herreshoff.Submitted by Peter Maxfield
  • The Compleat Cruiser: The Art, Practice and Enjoyment of Boating by L. Francis Herreshoff (Sheridan House). Submitted by Peter Maxfield
  • The Darkening Sea by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #20 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Dreamtime Voyage by Paul Caffyn. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “Solo kayak paddle around Australia in 200 days.”
  • The Far Side of the World by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the tenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Flag Captain by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #11 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Folding Schooner, and Other Adventures in Boat Design by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • The Fortune of War by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the sixth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Horatio Hornblower Series by C. S. Forester. Submitted by Jeff Cannon : “How could you have a list of great marine books without listing the Horatio Hornblower series? The series predates O’Brian’s Jack Avery and Kent’s Richard Bolitho. It set the bar for Napoleonic War fiction, a bar that is not often topped.”
  • The Hornblower Companion by C.S. Forester. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller
  • The Hundred Days by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the nineteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Improbable Voyage by Tristan Jones. Submitted by Jon Guth: “A wonderful account of Jones’ journey through Europe’s rivers aboard a catamaran. He is among the best at spinning yarns.”
  • The Inner Game of Tennis by W. Timothy Gallwey. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “If you have read Dr. Stuart Walker’s ‘Winning, the Psychology of Competition’ but found it hard going because you were not sure whether it was your id, ego or libido that made you try to bang the corner, this little book will help. It is a layman’s explanation about how, and why we don’t think and act like we would like to think and act while competing, and has some excellent advice on how to overcome the problem.”
  • The Inshore Squadron by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #13 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Ionian Mission by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the eighth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The “Kon-Tiki” Expedition: By Raft Across the South Seas by Thor Heyerdahl. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • The Last Grain Race by Eric Newby. Submitted by Kurt Hoehne: “Story of the greenhorn author’s adventure on one of the last big commercial square-rigger voyages on the eve of WWII. Really good read.”
  • The Last Place On Earth by Roland Huntford. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • The Lawson History of the America’s Cup by Winfield M. Thompson, Thomas W. Lawson.Submitted by John Drayton: “Collectable, antique tome; original 1901 edition may be hard, if not impossible to find, but the 1986 re-print is available second hand. This is a huge tome that looks good as coffee table fodder, but is also surprisingly easy to read, and regarded by many as the definitive history of the America’s Cup through 1900. Includes a great description/explanation of why Queen Victoria was unusually deferential when she toured the yacht America after it’s victory (the American’s weren’t her subjects, and she was effectively a guest of a foreign country when she came aboard).”
  • The Letter of Marque by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the twelth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Long Way by Bernard Moitessier. Submitted by Andrew Bray: “Any sailing library would be incomplete without (this) classic.”
  • The Master Mariner: Darken Ship: The Unfinished Novel by Nicholas Monsarrat. Submitted by Mark Baxter: “Mathew Law is cursed to sail the seas forever to atone for an act of cowardice. Over the centuries he has encounters with some of the greatest worst in our seafaring history. The Darken Ship second novel is only a couple of chapters and the outline of what was to be when the author passed away.”
  • The Master Mariner: Running Proud by Nicholas Monsarrat. Submitted by Mark Baxter: “Mathew Law is cursed to sail the seas forever to atone for an act of cowardice. Over the centuries he has encounters with some of the greatest worst in our seafaring history. The Darken Ship second novel is only a couple of chapters and the outline of what was to be when the author passed away.”
  • The Mauritius Command by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fourth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Nutmeg of Consolation by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fourteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Only Victor by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #18 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Proving Ground by G. Bruce Knecht. Submitted by Bill Kennedy: “A gripping story of the 1998 Sydney to Hobart Race in which boats were lost and sailors perished while others carried on in cyclone conditions. Walter Cronkte labeled this ‘a sailing masterpiece’ detailing ‘the Perfect Storm of blue-water sailboat racing.'”
  • The Race: The First Nonstop, Round-the-World, No-Holds-Barred Sailing Competition by Tim Zimmermann. Submitted by JJ Isler: “Great look at the extreme catamarans, clipper ships and Golden Globe characters!”
  • The Race to the White Continent: Voyages to the Antarctic by Alan Gurney. Submitted by John Rumsey: “About Antarctica; (he) also designed a few good boats.”
  • The Ramage Touch by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #10 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Post Captain Ramage is back in the Mediterranean, where he first took a command, prowling the Tuscan coast and far from English aid when he encounters a daunting French invasion fleet. As the enemy gathers strength, Ramage must decide how to thwart her actions with only the frigate Calypso and a pair of bomb ketches, prizes of combat but clumsy at best. With Frenchmen on every side, can the vessels and crew at hand answer his orders?”
  • The Remarkable World of Frances Barkley (1769-1845) by Beth Hill (1924-1997). Submitted by Scott: “Completely rewritten in a greatly expanded edition in 2003 by Cathy Converse and published by Touch Editions Ltd Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. At age 18, Frances Barkley was the first woman to openly sail around the world. Frances Barkley recorded her views of British Columbia and sailing travels beginning in 1786 when at age 17 she left England to embark on a round the world cruise that lasted eight years. It was a voyage of trade and exploration with husband Charles William Barkley , to transport sea-otter pelts across the Pacific Ocean from Vancouver Island to China. Her diary was in a boisterous world of experiences in meeting foreigners, precarious ocean journeys, foreign ports, giving birth at sea, and surviving the tragedy of their deaths.”
  • The Reverse of the Medal by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the eleventh of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Riddle of the Sands: A Record of Secret Service by Erskine Childers. Submitted by Steve Moore: “A great yarn and a wonderful read in several ways. It was the original English spy novel. It alerted the British to the potential threat from Germany. For sailors, it is a wonderful treatise on shoal water sailing.”
  • The Saga of Cimba by Richard Maury, Jonathan Raban. Submitted by JBW: “The story of a young man who sails his 35 foot schooner in 1933 from Nova Scotia down through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific to Tahiti and ultimately to Fiji. Filled with difficulties and tragedy, the book is eloquently written to reflect the day-to-day hardships and endeavors of the author. Originally written in 1939 and out of print for three decades and republished in 1971 and again in 2001, it represents the adventure most of us only dream about.”
  • The Sailor’s Son by Edward C. Clark. Submitted by author: “The Sailor’s Son centers on Pedro and ED, whose lives overlap around a web of intrigue with wide reaching entanglements. Pedro has seen a lot in his young life and flees Mexico with the violent loss of his mother. Ed strives to overcome his tough upbringing and takes action when members of his family are in danger. The story spans decades to search the extent to which one might go towards achieving a goal or defending an ideal. Time passes with Ed starting his own business and becoming a father and an avid sailor while Pedro becomes Peter Mancuso, achieving his idea of the American dream too. Ed and his son plan a sailboat trip, but things go awry when Ed Jr. lands in the hospital. With no leads in the investigation, Ed decides to “turn up the heat” In the concluding chapters, Ed is determined to set things right.”
  • The Sea Wolf: The Life of Admiral Cochrane by Ian Grimble. Submitted by Bruce Kirby: “Capt. Thomas Cochrane was this most extraordinary seaman, whose arch enemy Napoleon described as the Sea Wolf, and ‘the greatest fighting sea captain.’ If you liked the Russell Crowe movie (‘Master and Commander’) or the O’Brian novels, you will love these biographies of The Real Man.”
  • The Shadow in the Sands by Sam Llewellyn. Submitted by Marc Gentilin: “The continued story (of Riddle of the Sands). Just as entertaining.”
  • The Shipkiller by Justin Scott. Submitted by Manfred C. Schreiber, Germany: “What a story! An Atlantic Crossing, a rundown by a big tanker, a surviver who hunts the big ship with a SWAN around the globe. Fill in a little Mossad and some strange locations as well as Solent waters and River Rhein and you have to try to find this one to read.”
  • The Spirit of Rose Noelle: 119 Days Adrift: A Survival Story by John Glennie. Submitted by Sam Dalzell: “A sobering reminder of why you need a crew that you like and trust, and why your boat needs to be adequately stocked and equipped.”
  • The Story of The America’s Cup 1851-2000 by Ranulf Rayner, paintings by Tim Thompson.Submitted by Robert Johnston: “For every race, this complete history gives a straightforward blow-by-blow account, drawings and specifications on the competitors, a reproduction of an oil painting by Thompson of a critical moment, plus a history of courses and venues. The most comprehensive and readable reference I have found for the Cup races.”
  • The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst by Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall. Submitted by Peter Dodds: “A true story of singlehanded sailing’s strangest occurrence. Crowhurst creates a phony log showing fantastic accomplishments while he languishes around the Atlantic before apparently committing suicide by jumping overboard and watching his trimaran sail away.”
  • The Surgeon’s Mate by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the seventh of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Thirteen-Gun Salute by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the thirteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Thousand Dollar Yacht by Anthony Bailey. Submitted by Rick Perret: “His first nautical book about building/sailing a small boat. Funny and very readable.”
  • The Truelove by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fifteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Wine-Dark Sea by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the sixteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Yellow Admiral by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the eighteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Thirty Odd Boats by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Thoughts on Yachts and Yachting by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Three Men in a Boat : To Say Nothing of the Dog by Jerome K. Jerome. Submitted by Angela Howie: “A classic short read for anyone who has spent 24 hrs on a boat in the company of another person. Hilariously funny.”
  • Tinkerbelle by Robert Manry (Harper and Row). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Amazing story of a solo voyage across the Atlantic in a 13 foot sailboat.”
  • To Glory We Steer by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #5 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Treason’s Harbour by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the ninth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “Stevenson wrote this for his 12 year old stepson. Enjoyable for all ages.”
  • Two Years Before the Mast by Charles Henry Dana. Submitted by Whitney Rugg: “A classic.”

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  • Uffa’s Second Book by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Ultimate Sailing by Sharon Green. Submitted by Patrick Festing-Smith: “A comprehensive (168 page) coffee table book showing 20 years of amazing yacht racing photography by marine photojournalist Sharon Green. Fabulous photographs that will keep you glued to the pages for hours.”
  • Upset: Australia wins the America’s Cup by Michael Levitt & Barbara Lloyd. Submitted by Dan Nerney: “It is an unbiased story of the contentious summer of 1983 in Newport when the Australians arrived in Australia II with it’s “Dutch” designed keel and how the NYYC came very close to canceling the event. It reads like a Ludlum mystery novel with deeds of secrecy and intrigue and a few dirty tricks here and there across 3 continents. Read how the yacht club, convinced that the keel design was illegal, caved in the end to the pressure of world public opinion and watched as Bondy and Bertrand took the Cup in a thrilling 7 race series, the likes of which had not been seen before or since. A must read for the library of any America’s Cup fan.”
  • Under the Eye of the Storm by John Hersey. Submitted by Larry Pierce: “Fascinating study of how love turns to hate and friends become enemies on a simple summer weekend cruise. A perfect example of how sailing is a metaphor for life and what kind of demons are released when the weather gets out of control. Gripping and fast read. Most impact of any sailing story I ever read.”

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  • Voyage by Sterling Hayden. Submitted by Mark Baxter

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  • Wanderer by Sterling Hayden. Submitted by Suzi Beatie: “The author, a romantic, adventurous rebel, left his Hollywood career and failed marriage behind and commandeered his 4 young children to take them on the schooner, Wanderer to the South Seas. The book is autobiographical, and I think they left the dock in Sausalito, CA in the early 1960s. His good friends Spike and Red Africa and their small children went also. As many know, Spike was the original and true ‘President of the Pacific Ocean;’ he and his family were a living legend in Sausalito. His expert macramé adorned many a ships wheel and whisky bottle back then. I’m glad I’m old enough to remember the days when Sterling and Spike and pals sat at the No-Name in Sausalito and told sea stories a mile long. Spike used to make this toast, ‘Here’s to the ships and the women of our land, may the first be square-rigged and the second well-manned.’”
  • Wayward Sailor: In Search of the Real Tristan Jones by Anthony Dalton (International Marine, 2003). Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “The true story of Tristan Jones, the sailor-writer, whose best creation turns out to be his own enchanting biography. This great seaman and fine adventure writer also was a brazen mythmaker who was loved even by the people who knew the truth about him.”
  • We Followed Odysseus by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “The fabled history of the Greek Isles has attracted readers afloat and ashore for centuries. Follow in the wake of Odysseus as Hal and Margaret Roth explore the Greek Islands of today, and enjoy the places and people as seen through the observant eyes of this highly experienced cruising couple. Roth’s writing is always engaging, articulate, and well informed, and this book will be enjoyed by all who love distant lands, history, and people.”
  • Weather for Sailors by Bill Biewenga. Submitted by Lou Roberts: “Veteran navigator and weather router, Bill Biewenga, has just published a book in association with North U. called Weather for Sailors that finally discusses the topic in terms that I as a sailor can immediately apply to my cruising and racing strategies. In a methodical and concise style, he covers the essential elements of meteorology, synoptic scale climatology, local weather conditions and oceanography that as sailors care about. Nothing more, nothing less. He addresses the concerns of all types of sailors including distance passage-makers, racers, cruisers and delivery captains. It’s well illustrated and peppered with examples from his vast experience at sea. The best thing it does is to make sense of the vast array of weather data that is flooding the Internet and airwaves. I highly recommend it.”
  • White Sails, Black Clouds by John “Don” McNamara Jr. Submitted by Tom Price: “Don was that rare combination of a good author as well as a good sailor. Campaigns in 5.5 meter boats, offshore races on “Ondine,” helming and dismissal from the “Nefertiti” Twelve meter campaign, losing an Olympic gold on the last crossing, the painful construction of a custom offshore yacht and a wonderful “whither bound” epilog that now, viewed from 30 some years on, is a great insight on where our sport has gone. Very East Coast, monied and keelboat oriented, Don McNamara nonetheless has a wonderful turn of phrase and doesn’t hesitate to portray his losses as well as his winning races. Obviously a man who loved his sailing. Great photographs by George Silk, Rosenfeld and others.”
  • White Wings Around the World by Donald M. Green. Submitted by Patrick Festing-Smith: “A 1953 book written after the brigantine ‘Yankee’ completed her 1950-1952 cruise around the world with Commander Irving Johnson at the helm along with twenty-one American kids and one Canadian … Donald Green. Written by Green at the age of only 18 it gives a teenagers view into the fascination of the journey and the friendships made along the way. Some of you may know Mr. Green in his later years as he would go on to be a Captain of Canadian Industry, win the Canada’s Cup in 1978 in his famous yacht ‘EvergGreen’ and would also bid challenge for the America’s Cup in the twelve meter “True North”. Interesting how your life can be shaped at an early age.”
  • Winning: The Psychology of Competition by Stuart H. Walker. Submitted by Tom Price: “The best of Stu Walker’s books. Any advanced racer will tell you that the best thing he can do to improve his game is to unlock the mental aspect of winning and losing. Stuart writes in a looser style than his more technical books and uses examples from winners (and losers) in many sports.”
  • With All Despatch by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #8 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Wrecking Crew by Mark Chisnell. Submitted by Chris Nelson: “Set in the steamy jungle of Indonesia and the shipping lanes of Borneo, Wrecking Crew features modern day piracy and psychological dilemmas such as;can you justify killing someone you don’t know in order to save the life of someone you love? And if so, how many strangers is it O.K. to kill?”

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  • Maiden Voyage by Tania Aebi. Submitted by Tim Kent: “A wonderful story of a young girl blessed with the family and the spirit of adventure that prompted a solo circumnavigation remarkable for its success and the tenacity of the young woman who made it. This story is both a sailing story and a voyage of discovery – as are all good sailing stories. My young daughters and I enjoyed it equally.”
  • Sarah’s Boat: A Young Girl Learns the Art of Sailing by Douglas Alvord. Submitted by Deborah Abbott: “The line between fiction and nonfiction is blurred in this story about Sarah, who is taught to sail by her grandfather and perfects her skills enough to leap from a Puddleduck to a Bluejay sloop. With her grandfather, she sands, varnishes, and paints the Bluejay and then practices learning the ropes of the bigger boat. She enters the Labor Day race and beats several boys who have taken her for granted. This book is peculiar because the plot is predictable and the characters somewhat stereotyped; yet the sailing information, glossary, and drawings are exceptionally good. Readers of fiction may be turned off by the picture-book format, but young sailors will peruse this volume with interest. Color and black pencil sketches accompany the text, but it is the precise sailing drawings that will catch the eye. Recommended for young would-be sailors.”
  • My First Picture Book of Boating Words by Nicholas Agro. Submitted by Nicholas Agro: “This unique picture book is designed to teach young children about boating words. It includes sailing and other boating terminology. Each page contains color photos of boating objects along with the name of each object beneath it. It’s a great way to introduce boating words to future sailors.”

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  • The Coast of Summer: Sailing New England Waters from Shelter Island to Cape Cod by Anthony Bailey. Submitted by Rick Perret: “A warm, well written book of Bailey’s annual summer cruises along New England coast from his home base in Stonington, CT – something he’s been doing each summer for nearly 30 years. He’s a great writer and its the perfect book for cold New England winters.”
  • The Thousand Dollar Yacht by Anthony Bailey. Submitted by Rick Perret: “His first nautical book about building/sailing a small boat. Funny and very readable.”
  • High Performance Sailing by Frank Bethwaite. Submitted by Doug Petter: “The most comprehensive book around about the relationship between meteorology and sailing. Not for the beginning sailor, however, as there is a vast amount of technical information. If you really know your stuff you might push through it in a few weeks. A must-have reference book for the serious sailor.”
  • Weather for Sailors by Bill Biewenga. Submitted by Lou Roberts: “Veteran navigator and weather router, Bill Biewenga, has just published a book in association with North U. called Weather for Sailors that finally discusses the topic in terms that I as a sailor can immediately apply to my cruising and racing strategies. In a methodical and concise style, he covers the essential elements of meteorology, synoptic scale climatology, local weather conditions and oceanography that as sailors care about. Nothing more, nothing less. He addresses the concerns of all types of sailors including distance passage-makers, racers, cruisers and delivery captains. It’s well illustrated and peppered with examples from his vast experience at sea. The best thing it does is to make sense of the vast array of weather data that is flooding the Internet and airwaves. I highly recommend it.”
  • High Latitude, North Atlantic: 30,000 Miles Through Cold Seas And History by John R. Bockstoce. Submitted by Rob Honecks: “Arctic scholar and voyager John Bockstoce recounts 10 passages he made into northern latitudes during the 1990s in his sturdy motor-sailer Belvedere. From Svalbard, north of Norway, to Scotland and the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and Labrador –as well as a trip through the Northwest Passage with William Simon– Bockstoce and his crews tracked the courses of Norse voyagers, Irish monks, English and Dutch whalers, Inuit hunters, European explorers, and German submariners in this account of human activity and natural phenomena in the frozen North.”
  • First You Have to Row a Little Boat: Reflections On Life and Living by Richard Bode. Submitted by John McNeill: “This little volume, still readily available at most book sources for about $10-12, is a wonderful blend of one mans youthful development of love for the sport, and the life lessons that came from that experience. If you know sailing as an avocation, or want to introduce someone to the love of the sport, this is THE book to provide. It is a delightful quick read and will actually fit in some larger Christmas stockings.”
  • Boats with an Open Mind by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Different Boats by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Small Boats by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • The Folding Schooner, and Other Adventures in Boat Design by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • Thirty Odd Boats by Phil Bolger. Submitted by Dave: “Anything by Phil Bolger; they’re all wonderful mind stretchers.”
  • In Peril: A Daring Decision, A Captain’s Resolve, and the Salvage that Made History by Twain Braden, Skip Strong. Submitted by Win Fowler: “Not a sailing book but a great tale of courage and seamanship.”
  • Longboat To Hawaii by Alexander Crosby Brown (Cornell Maritime Press). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Compiled from the journals of the Captain and two passengers on the Clipper Ship Hornet bound from New York to San Francisco in 1866 which was destroyed by fire in the Pacific. The journals contain the observations of the cruise as seen from three different perspectives, then the accounts of the subsequent voyage of one of the ship’s longboats with 15 survivors to the island of Hawaii – 4000 miles in 43 days on 10 days’ provisions. Concludes with interviews of the survivors by Mark Twain who was then in Hawaii.”
  • Run to the Lee by Kenneth Brooks. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “A Chesapeake Bay winter story. If home water is Chesapeake Bay, it’s a must read.”
  • Steaming to Bamboola – The World of a Tramp Freighter by Christopher Buckley. Submitted by Anton Huggler
  • Airborne by William F. Buckley. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”
  • Atlantic High by William F. Buckley. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”
  • Racing Through Paradise: A Pacific Passage by William F. Buckley. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”

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  • The Dreamtime Voyage by Paul Caffyn. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “Solo kayak paddle around Australia in 200 days.”
  • Adrift by Steven Callahan. Submitted by JJ Isler: “Just have a bottle of water handy because his story makes you really thirsty.”
  • Storm and Silence by Joe Cannon. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “A hard cruising tale of a circumnavigation of the Tasman Sea from Tasmania to Fjiordland NZ to Norfolk Island and S.E Australia with plenty of hard won observations on small boat rough ocean voyaging.”
  • Gypsy Moth Circles the World by Sir Francis Chichester. Submitted by Steve Schupak: “Put the kids to bed, send the wife off to watch The Bachelor, grab that glass of scotch and enjoy!”
  • The Riddle of the Sands: A Record of Secret Service by Erskine Childers. Submitted by Steve Moore: “A great yarn and a wonderful read in several ways. It was the original English spy novel. It alerted the British to the potential threat from Germany. For sailors, it is a wonderful treatise on shoal water sailing.”
  • Wrecking Crew by Mark Chisnell. Submitted by Chris Nelson: “Set in the steamy jungle of Indonesia and the shipping lanes of Borneo, Wrecking Crew features modern day piracy and psychological dilemmas such as;can you justify killing someone you don’t know in order to save the life of someone you love? And if so, how many strangers is it O.K. to kill?”
  • The Sailor’s Son by Edward C. Clark. Submitted by author: “The Sailor’s Son centers on Pedro and ED, whose lives overlap around a web of intrigue with wide reaching entanglements. Pedro has seen a lot in his young life and flees Mexico with the violent loss of his mother. Ed strives to overcome his tough upbringing and takes action when members of his family are in danger. The story spans decades to search the extent to which one might go towards achieving a goal or defending an ideal. Time passes with Ed starting his own business and becoming a father and an avid sailor while Pedro becomes Peter Mancuso, achieving his idea of the American dream too. Ed and his son plan a sailboat trip, but things go awry when Ed Jr. lands in the hospital. With no leads in the investigation, Ed decides to “turn up the heat” In the concluding chapters, Ed is determined to set things right.”
  • Sail Like a Champion by Dennis Conner and Michael Levitt. Submitted by Graham Kelly: “My nomination for best racing book for advanced sailors. This 1992 book combines a high level of sophistication with a clear and logical presentation of the relevant issues. Its a bit like an America’s Cup level text for those of us who aspire to sail at the highest possible level, but don’t have the time or opportunity to sail in an Around the World Race or America’s Cup, or the resources to hire professional crew.”
  • The America’s Cup: The History of Sailing’s Greatest Competition in the Twentieth Century by Dennis Conner and Michael Levitt. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • Heavy Weather Sailing by K. Adlard Coles. Submitted by David Norris
  • Inspiring Leadership: Staying Afloat in Turbulent Times by Jane Cranwell-Ward. Submitted by Pascal Desmarets: “Using the unique case study of the BT Global Challenge 2000/1, round the world yacht race, the authors tracked the 12 skippers and studied their behavior as they led their teams. The book provides an in-depth understanding of what makes a high performing leader and how to sustain competitive advantage. The study has revealed that the key to exceptional performance is the ability to use Emotional Intelligence and to combine ‘driving’ and ‘enabling’ leadership behavior.”
  • Oliver’s Surprise by Carol Newman Cronin. Submitted by Nelson Weiderman: “What a delightful short tale provided as Carol Newman Cronin’s first offering! The publisher has dubbed this “Young Adult/Fiction”, but that is really unfair. This story and writing style is accessible to and appropriate for pre-teens, and the topic will also give pleasure to “old school” post-boomers. For our younger children it will be a revelation of what our world looked like about 70 years ago. For our oldsters it is a reminder of what the world was like without television, when manners prevailed, and when all t-shirts were white. I would recommend this book for “all readers”, and especially for those with an interest in boats, the seaside, or the memorable past.”
  • BT Global Challenge: The World’s Toughest Yacht Race by Betsy Crowfoot and Manley Hopkinson. Submitted by Zulu Mama: “Spectacular photos by Mark Pepper & various onboard photographers punctuate the story of ‘The World’s Toughest Yacht Race’ – the 2000/01 BT Global Challenge. Follow 12 teams around the world ‘the wrong way’ through tropics and tempests.”
  • In the Wake of Bass and Flinders by Bern Cuthbertson. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “Gives a new meaning to building and voyaging a historic replica.”
  • Five Hundred Sailing Records of American Built Ships by Carl C. Cutler. Submitted by Cam Lewis: “Any book on sailing records by Carl C. Cutler makes for some interesting reading. Gives some perspective to the chases in Master and Commander.”
  • Greyhounds of the Sea: The Story of the American Clipper Ship by Carl C. Cutler. Submitted by Cam Lewis: “Any book on sailing records by Carl C. Cutler makes for some interesting reading. Gives some perspective to the chases in Master and Commander.”

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  • Two Years Before the Mast by Charles Henry Dana. Submitted by Whitney Rugg: “A classic.”
  • Wayward Sailor : In Search of the Real Tristan Jones by Anthony Dalton (International Marine, 2003). Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “The true story of Tristan Jones, the sailor-writer, whose best creation turns out to be his own enchanting biography. This great seaman and fine adventure writer also was a brazen mythmaker who was loved even by the people who knew the truth about him.”
  • Surviving the Storm: Coastal and Offshore Tactics by Steve and Linda Dashew (Beowulf, Inc). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “A tremendous source of information for learning how to deal with severe weather, including sailing techniques, equipment, and boat preparedness. Contains dozens of interviews with sailors who experienced extreme weather. Far more information than offered in almost any safety at sea seminar and a must if planning to sail offshore.”
  • Illustrated Sail & Rig Tuning by Ivar Dedekam. Submitted by John Flato: “This is my favorite book on sail trim. It not only explains what to do, but why to do it. It is organized well and has great illustations. It is not just for novices, but has information that more experienced sailors will find useful. “

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  • Living Every Second by Tracy Edwards. Submitted by Susan Johnson: “Against unimaginable odds, Tracy Edwards captained the first all-woman crew to victory in the Whitbread Round-the-World Cup in 1989. Her autobiography takes the reader through her Whitbread victory and her attempt at the Jules Verne Trophy in 1998. Her personal life is also examined.”

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  • Overboard by Elizabeth Fama. Submitted by Manfred C. Schreiber, Germany: “Fantastic story with a lot of true elements and a finish which you won´t forget easily. DO NOT turn on the last page before reading the whole story. A must read for everyone who loves boats and dreams about the long trip.”
  • Captain from Connecticut by C.S. Forester. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller
  • The Horatio Hornblower Series by C. S. Forester. Submitted by Jeff Cannon : “How could you have a list of great marine books without listing the Horatio Hornblower series? The series predates O’Brian’s Jack Avery and Kent’s Richard Bolitho. It set the bar for Napoleonic War fiction, a bar that is not often topped.”
  • The Hornblower Companion by C.S. Forester. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller
  • Racing, Cruising and Design by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Sail and Power by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Sailing, Seamanship and Yacht Construction by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Thoughts on Yachts and Yachting by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”
  • Uffa’s Second Book by Uffa Fox. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “(One of) Uffa Fox’s Big 5 – reviews of designs and events during the 1930s. Drawings and critiques are great; the accounts are unique. Highlights include the classic transatlantic aboard Typhoon, a transatlantic race aboard Stormy Weather with the Stephens’ and a neat review of Olin’s (new) design of Dorade.”

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  • The Inner Game of Tennis by W. Timothy Gallwey. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “If you have read Dr. Stuart Walker’s ‘Winning, the Psychology of Competition’ but found it hard going because you were not sure whether it was your id, ego or libido that made you try to bang the corner, this little book will help. It is a layman’s explanation about how, and why we don’t think and act like we would like to think and act while competing, and has some excellent advice on how to overcome the problem.”
  • Song of the Sirens by Earnest K. Gann. Submitted by Eric Zoehrer: “Great book chronicling unique experiences aboard past ‘sirens.'”
  • Down to the Sea: The Fishing Schooners of Gloucester by Joseph Garland. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller: “An account of the Schoonermen of Glochester.They lost nearly 700 vessels and 4,000 men in the 60 years that were their prime.”
  • Sea Hunter: A Novel of Suspense by Paul Garrison. Submitted by the Curmudgeon: “With his electrifying fast-paced thrillers, Paul Garrison has firmly established himself as the premiere author of contemporary high seas adventure. In Sea Hunter, a multihull charter captain takes on his last charter of the Caribbean season for what started as a filming a project, but things changed when they encountered a towering high tech Windjammer that was not the harmless research vessel it purports to be. Lots of intrigue, plenty of suspense, the US Navy is involved and there is even a bit of boy/ girl to complete the formula. And it all takes place on a 45-foot catamaran. A quick read that any sailor will enjoy.”
  • The Spirit of Rose Noelle: 119 Days Adrift: A Survival Story by John Glennie. Submitted by Sam Dalzell: “A sobering reminder of why you need a crew that you like and trust, and why your boat needs to be adequately stocked and equipped.”
  • Close to the Wind by Pete Goss. Submitted by RFH: “Retells Pete’s experience in the 1996-97 Vendee Globe, including a detailed account of his rescue, after a 160 mile beat to windward in hurricane force winds, of Raphael Dinelli from his life raft adrift in the Southern Ocean. The book is well written, a story of seamanship, heroism, and a sailor’s passion for the open ocean. After reading it, I was left wondering what Goss Challenges might have accomplished had their radical, ill-fated Adrian Thompson-designed catamaran been able to compete in The Race or campaign for the Jules Verne trophy (this book was previously brought to my attention in a 2002 edition of Scuttlebutt).”
  • Dove by Robin Lee Graham. Submitted by Tim Kent: “This tale of a young boy who sailed around the world alone predates Tania Aebi’s feat by more than thirty years (see Tania’s book, ‘Maiden Voyage’). In the days before GPS and satellite communication, this amazing adventure story fueled my early desire to sail solo around the world. Great reading for young adult and armchair sailor alike.”
  • White Wings Around the World by Donald M. Green. Submitted by Patrick Festing-Smith: “A 1953 book written after the brigantine ‘Yankee’ completed her 1950-1952 cruise around the world with Commander Irving Johnson at the helm along with twenty-one American kids and one Canadian … Donald Green. Written by Green at the age of only 18 it gives a teenagers view into the fascination of the journey and the friendships made along the way. Some of you may know Mr. Green in his later years as he would go on to be a Captain of Canadian Industry, win the Canada’s Cup in 1978 in his famous yacht ‘EvergGreen’ and would also bid challenge for the America’s Cup in the twelve meter “True North”. Interesting how your life can be shaped at an early age.”
  • The Art of Coarse Cruising by Michael Green. Submitted by Edward Fryer: “(Among) the only truly funny books written about sailing.”
  • The Art of Coarse Sailing by Michael Green. Submitted by Edward Fryer: “(Among) the only truly funny books written about sailing.”
  • Ultimate Sailing by Sharon Green. Submitted by Patrick Festing-Smith: “A comprehensive (168 page) coffee table book showing 20 years of amazing yacht racing photography by marine photojournalist Sharon Green. Fabulous photographs that will keep you glued to the pages for hours.”
  • The Sea Wolf: The Life of Admiral Cochrane by Ian Grimble. Submitted by Bruce Kirby: “Capt. Thomas Cochrane was this most extraordinary seaman, whose arch enemy Napoleon described as the Sea Wolf, and ‘the greatest fighting sea captain.’ If you liked the Russell Crowe movie (‘Master and Commander’) or the O’Brian novels, you will love these biographies of The Real Man.”
  • The Race to the White Continent: Voyages to the Antarctic by Alan Gurney. Submitted by John Rumsey: “About Antarctica; (he) also designed a few good boats.”

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  • Doctor Dogbody’s Leg (Heart of Oak Sea Classics Series) by James Norman Hall. Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “Part of a series called Heart of Oak Sea Series. One of the funniest and most enjoyable books I’ve read in a while. Very entertaining story of how the good doctor lost his leg. Actually, he tells about 8 different stories to a bunch of guys sitting around in a pub.”
  • Muskrat: A Surprise Bid For The America’s Cup by Douglas Hanks. Submitted by Kip Wiley: “A tongue in cheek look at an alternative attempt to win the Cup. Sounds almost possible/plausible with all the shenanigans of modern day ‘Cupping’.”
  • Cochrane: The Life and Exploits of a Fighting Captain by Robert Harvey. Submitted by Bruce Kirby: “Capt. Thomas Cochrane was this most extraordinary seaman, whose arch enemy Napoleon described as the Sea Wolf, and ‘the greatest fighting sea captain.’ If you liked the Russell Crowe movie or the O’Brian novels, you will love these biographies of The Real Man.”
  • Voyage by Sterling Hayden. Submitted by Mark Baxter
  • Wanderer by Sterling Hayden. Submitted by Suzi Beatie: “The author, a romantic, adventurous rebel, left his Hollywood career and failed marriage behind and commandeered his 4 young children to take them on the schooner, Wanderer to the South Seas. The book is autobiographical, and I think they left the dock in Sausalito, CA in the early 1960s. His good friends Spike and Red Africa and their small children went also. As many know, Spike was the original and true ‘President of the Pacific Ocean;’ he and his family were a living legend in Sausalito. His expert macramé adorned many a ships wheel and whisky bottle back then. I’m glad I’m old enough to remember the days when Sterling and Spike and pals sat at the No-Name in Sausalito and told sea stories a mile long. Spike used to make this toast, ‘Here’s to the ships and the women of our land, may the first be square-rigged and the second well-manned.’”
  • My Old Man and the Sea: A Father and Son Sail Around Cape Horn by David Hayes and Daniel Hayes. Submitted by C. Kondracky: “An account of a father and son’s trip on their small boat around the horn. It was funny and touching and should be read by anyone who sails in Long Island Sound.”
  • Captain Nat Herreshoff: The Wizard of Bristol by L. Francis Herreshoff. Submitted by John Drayton: “Bio of arguably the most influential racing yacht designer ever.”
  • The Common Sense of Yacht Design- 2 volumes (The Rudder) by L. Francis Herreshoff. Submitted by Peter Maxfield
  • The Compleat Cruiser: The Art, Practice and Enjoyment of Boating by L. Francis Herreshoff (Sheridan House).Submitted by Peter Maxfield
  • Under the Eye of the Storm by John Hersey. Submitted by Larry Pierce: “Fascinating study of how love turns to hate and friends become enemies on a simple summer weekend cruise. A perfect example of how sailing is a metaphor for life and what kind of demons are released when the weather gets out of control. Gripping and fast read. Most impact of any sailing story I ever read.”
  • Kon-Tiki: Across the Pacific by Raft by Thor Heyerdahl. Submitted by Tim Kent: “Although his anthropological conclusions are famously suspect, it is hard to top the yarn in this book, especially for a young, adventure hungry reader. Even though his theories may be bunk, this tale of sailing the Pacific on a raft is a wonderful read.”
  • The ” Kon-Tiki” Expedition: By Raft Across the South Seas by Thor Heyerdahl. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • The Remarkable World of Frances Barkley (1769-1845) by Beth Hill (1924-1997). Submitted by Scott: “Completely rewritten in a greatly expanded edition in 2003 by Cathy Converse and published by Touch Editions Ltd Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. At age 18, Frances Barkley was the first woman to openly sail around the world. Frances Barkley recorded her views of British Columbia and sailing travels beginning in 1786 when at age 17 she left England to embark on a round the world cruise that lasted eight years. It was a voyage of trade and exploration with husband Charles William Barkley , to transport sea-otter pelts across the Pacific Ocean from Vancouver Island to China. Her diary was in a boisterous world of experiences in meeting foreigners, precarious ocean journeys, foreign ports, giving birth at sea, and surviving the tragedy of their deaths.”
  • Northern Lights by Desmond Holdridge. Submitted by Charles J. Doane: “It is a beautifully written account of a very interesting, ultimately disastrous cruise to northernmost Labrador in a converted potato lugger in 1925.”
  • Ted Hood: Through Hand and Eye by Ted Hood and Michael Levitt. Submitted by G. Bruce Knecht: “Ted Hood built a 12-foot sailboat of his own design when he was just 15, and he has been doing pretty much the same thing ever since. Hundreds of his boats on the water today, and his sails on every America’s Cup defender from 1962 through 1977. Mr. Hood has long been known for letting his accomplishments do most of his talking, but now he has written this lavishly illustrated, large-format autobiography with Michael Levitt, the New York Yacht Club’s communications director.”
  • Mariners are Warned! by Marsden Horden. Submitted by Craig Coulsen: “The Royal Hydrographic Office at it’s best so next time you use a chart just check the date of the surveys.”
  • Sou’West & by West of Cape Cod by Llewellyn Howland. Submitted by Steve Howard: “(This book) brings us back to an era that many of us wish to have been a part, to a region of great renown in our sport, and to relationships with men of stature and understanding not often in evidence today. The chapter of the challenge race leaves you exhausted, cold and wet; those describing a proper clambake and Christmas celebration have you loosening your belt a couple of notches.”
  • The Last Place On Earth by Roland Huntford. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha


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  • Three Men in a Boat : To Say Nothing of the Dog by Jerome K. Jerome. Submitted by Angela Howie: “A classic short read for anyone who has spent 24 hrs on a boat in the company of another person. Hilariously funny.”
  • Championship Tactics by Gary Jobson. Submitted by R.J. Lewy: “The best book on tactics with personal anecdotes from Gary and his racing experiences.”
  • Fighting Finish: The Volvo Ocean Race: Round the World 2001-2002 by Gary Jobson. Submitted by R.J. Lewy: “This book not only won the ‘best sports book of 2002’ but it is a fantastic ‘coffee table’ book with the best photos details of the last Volvo Ocean Race (2001-2002).”
  • Adrift by Tristan Jones. Submitted by Cam Lewis
  • The Improbable Voyage by Tristan Jones. Submitted by Jon Guth: “A wonderful account of Jones’ journey through Europe’s rivers aboard a catamaran. He is among the best at spinning yarns.”
  • Sailing With Scoundrels and Kings by John Jourdane. Submitted by Scuttlebutt: “After sailing over 300,000 miles, breaking masts in every ocean on earth, and competing on some of the hallmark boats and races in the sport, Jourdane narrates the experiences of his 45-year journey. Simple writing, almost log-style, keeps the reader to the facts, and allows the mind to wander and consider the life style he led. Fast, enjoyable read, and particularly a must for anyone who sailed with John (just to find out what he might have said about you.”
  • Icebergs, Port and Starboard: The Whitbread Round the World Race by John R. Jourdane. Submitted by G.G. Thompson: “A really ‘down to earth’ description of the Whitbread Round the World Race. John, an American, describes what it was like preparing for and racing around the world with a boatload of New Zealanders on Fisher & Paykel, New Zealand. You get a real feel for the race (now known as the Volvo Ocean Race).”

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  • Midshipman Bolitho by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the first of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Stand into Danger by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #2 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • In Gallant Company by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #3 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Sloop of War by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #4 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • To Glory We Steer by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #5 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Command a King’s Ship by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #6 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Passage to Mutiny by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #7 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • With All Despatch by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #8 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Form Line of Battle by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #9 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Enemy in Sight by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #10 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Flag Captain by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #11 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Signal-Close Action by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #12 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Inshore Squadron by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #13 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • A Tradition of Victory by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #14 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Success to the Brave by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #15 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Colours Aloft by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #16 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Honour this Day by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #17 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Only Victor by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #18 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Beyond the Reef by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #19 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • The Darkening Sea by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #20 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • For My Country’s Freedom by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #21 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Cross of St. George by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #22 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Sword of Honour by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #23 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Second to None by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #24 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Relentless Pursuit by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #25 of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • Man of War by Alexander Kent (The Richard Bolitho Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the last of Kent’s 26 novels with Richard Bolitho as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books entertaining will enjoy this series as well. Follow Bolitho’s career from midshipman to Captain to Admiral and all the ships and crew he worked with. Based on historical events and provides an excellent view into life as a sailor during the Napoleon wars.”
  • N by E by Rockwell Kent. Submitted by Patrick Broderick: “Artist, author, sailor Rockwell Kent’s account of an actual voyage to Greenland in a small boat, North-by-East across Davis Strait, of shipwreck, but with a happy ending. First published in 1930 and Illustrated with Kent’s wonderful woodblock prints. Worthy of a read (Kent illustrated other editions of “Moby Dick”, “The Canterbury Tales”, among many others).”
  • A Sea of Words: A Lexicon and Companion for Patrick O’Brian’s Seafaring Tales by Dean King. Submitted by Ned Hall: “(This) helps explain the words that are very much of that period -“tie-wig”?, “flog the glass”?, as examples. Knowing these might add to the understanding, if not ones greater pleasure of these richly-crafted novels.”
  • The Proving Ground by G. Bruce Knecht. Submitted by Bill Kennedy: “A gripping story of the 1998 Sydney to Hobart Race in which boats were lost and sailors perished while others carried on in cyclone conditions. Walter Cronkte labeled this ‘a sailing masterpiece’ detailing ‘the Perfect Storm of blue-water sailboat racing.'”

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  • Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing. Submitted by Bruce Gresham: “It is far and away the best sailing adventure I have every read. The greatest survival story of all time. Every bit of it true. The highlight is the description of the sail of the James Caird, a converted 22-foot work boat by three men across 1,200 miles of the Southern Ocean.”
  • Around the World in 79 Days by Cam Lewis and Michael Levitt. Submitted by Thomas Newcomb: “About the first successful Trophée Jules Verne sail that takes you around the world in less than 80 days with the author and crew. This book is one of the great adventure stories of our time.”
  • Upset: Australia wins the America’s Cup by Michael Levitt & Barbara Lloyd. Submitted by Dan Nerney: “It is an unbiased story of the contentious summer of 1983 in Newport when the Australians arrived in Australia II with it’s “Dutch” designed keel and how the NYYC came very close to canceling the event. It reads like a Ludlum mystery novel with deeds of secrecy and intrigue and a few dirty tricks here and there across 3 continents. Read how the yacht club, convinced that the keel design was illegal, caved in the end to the pressure of world public opinion and watched as Bondy and Bertrand took the Cup in a thrilling 7 race series, the likes of which had not been seen before or since. A must read for the library of any America’s Cup fan.”
  • Blood Knot by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Blood Orange by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Dead Reckoning by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Deadeye by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • Death Roll by Sam Llewellyn. Sumbitted by Ryan Werner: “(Here is one of) Sam Llewellyn’s five sailing pot boilers appear to be out of print, but available used. Very enjoyable mystery/thrillers all with a sailboat racing bent.”
  • The Shadow in the Sands by Sam Llewellyn. Submitted by Marc Gentilin: “The continued story (of Riddle of the Sands). Just as entertaining.”
  • Godforsaken Sea : The True Story of a Race Through the World’s Most Dangerous Waters by Derek Lundy.Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha

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  • Taking on the World: A Sailor’s Extraordinary Solo Race Around the Globe by Ellen MacArthur. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “The world of ocean racing is a marriage of engineering, sponsorship, skill, luck, individual determination and guts. Read Ellen MacArthur’s story of her early sailing experiences and her single-handed and crewed extreme sailing adventures and you will discover a woman of focus and skill who ‘takes on the world’ in a remarkable fashion. Ms. MacArthur shares her thoughts and emotions at all stages of her preparation and racing, and she gives enough technical information and detail to satisfy both novice and experienced sailors. After reading this exciting, personal saga, I found myself thinking ‘What had I done by age 25?’”
  • Sailing Promise: Around the World on a Catamaran by Alayne Main. Submitted by Skip Belter: “If you ever wondered about long distance cruising, pick this book up and follow the trail of this young married couple as they fulfill a dream. A must-read for crusing couples venturing into the unknown.”
  • Chapman Piloting and Seamanship by Elbert S. Maloney. Submitted by Irv Heller: “A must have for any rag hauler or stink potter. THE BIBLE! This book was a faithful companion in my youth, and was, in large part, responsible for me eventually becoming a licensed Captain. First time sailor to seasoned salt. Rowboat to large motor yacht. Navigation, anchoring, knots, safety at sea…this is the most complete and comprehensive boating instruction book I have ever seen. Don’t leave port without it!”
  • Sailing Theory and Practice by Czeslaw A. Marchaj. Submitted by Chris Allen: “A Scientific Analysis, with 335 Drawings and Photographs of the Aerodynamic, Hydrodynamic, and Other Design Factors which Define a Yatch’s Behavior”
  • Seaworthiness: The Forgotten Factor by Czeslaw A. Marchaj. Submitted by Bruce Thompson: “Written in the aftermath of the 1979 Fastnet, it is a qualitative assessment of the factors influencing the seaworthiness of yachts. It is a wake up call to designers who are sacrificing safety for all out speed. While it is technical in nature, the last chapter alone is required reading for anyone who ventures offshore. It provides a clear basis for deciding on what storm survival tactics will work best based on the actual conditions present.”
  • Tinkerbelle by Robert Manry (Harper and Row). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Amazing story of a solo voyage across the Atlantic in a 13 foot sailboat.”
  • The Saga of Cimba by Richard Maury, Jonathan Raban. Submitted by JBW: “The story of a young man who sails his 35 foot schooner in 1933 from Nova Scotia down through the Panama Canal and across the Pacific to Tahiti and ultimately to Fiji. Filled with difficulties and tragedy, the book is eloquently written to reflect the day-to-day hardships and endeavors of the author. Originally written in 1939 and out of print for three decades and republished in 1971 and again in 2001, it represents the adventure most of us only dream about.”
  • Bottoms Up! by Robert McKenna. Submitted by Scuttlebutt: “We occassionally get books sent to us, and some we even read. While we haven’t read this one yet from stem to stern, we do enjoy flipping through the pages. One has to worry about McKenna, who must have sat on many a bar stool to have collected such info. If you enjoy a cocktail, and can read at the same time, this books for you. Heck, even if you don’t read, ‘Bottoms Up!’ looks great on the bar.”
  • Down Channel by R. T. McMullen. Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “A pioneer cruising book when first published in 1869 and remains enthralling and instructive to this day. Full of adventure and eccentricity, this classic is the record of vigorous voyages by a man who took keen pleasure in meeting challenges with what he called ‘my hard sailing habits.’ He enjoyed discomfort. Nobody summarized the pastime better than McMullen when he observed that cruising under sail is like ‘successfully gathering roses off thorns.’”
  • White Sails, Black Clouds by John “Don” McNamara Jr. Submitted by Tom Price: “Don was that rare combination of a good author as well as a good sailor. Campaigns in 5.5 meter boats, offshore races on “Ondine,” helming and dismissal from the “Nefertiti” Twelve meter campaign, losing an Olympic gold on the last crossing, the painful construction of a custom offshore yacht and a wonderful “whither bound” epilog that now, viewed from 30 some years on, is a great insight on where our sport has gone. Very East Coast, monied and keelboat oriented, Don McNamara nonetheless has a wonderful turn of phrase and doesn’t hesitate to portray his losses as well as his winning races. Obviously a man who loved his sailing. Great photographs by George Silk, Rosenfeld and others.”
  • Sailing Smart : Winning Techniques, Tactics, And Strategies by Buddy Melges and Charles Mason. Submitted by Doris Colgate: “Buddy Melges is so thorough, so clear, and so giving that any sailor who absorbs and applies his advice can’t help but win. He is witty, entertaining, and sincere in his desire to promote better sailors….It’s a book you can’t stop reading.”
  • Moby Dick, or the White Whale by Herman Melville. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “Truly one of the greatest books of all time.”
  • 1421: The Year China Discovered America by Gavin Menzies. Submitted by Bruce McPherson: “Captain Menzies is an extremely intelligent and intuitive retired Royal Navy submarine skipper with a serious bent for the history of charting and navigation. This very readable book covers the author’s piecing together the worldwide explorations of Chinese “Treasure Fleets of 1421-1423. The depth and insight illustrated herein are nothing short of mind boggling: start with the fact that Columbus used Chinese data when he ‘rediscovered’ America!”
  • Berserk – My Voyage to the Antarctic in a Twenty-Seven-Foot Sailboat by David Mercy. Submitted by the Curmudgeon: “The single word ‘powerful’ seems like the most appropriate way to describe Mercy’s new sailing-adventure book. The title tells you what the book is all about, but it can not possibly convey the excitement or the gripping drama of this true story. It’s a fascinating tale told by a gifted taleteller. This book is definitely not about sailboat racing, but anyone who has ever sailed – and those who have not – will become quickly immersed in this fast paced adventure story. “
  • Cruising At Last: Sailing the East Coast by Elliott Merrick (Lyons Press, 2003). Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “A wonderful old-fashioned coastal cruising book. No great storms here, just a passionate, articulate, wry sailor in a small boat, demonstrating the transforming art of living aboard a boat and visiting interesting places.”
  • Broadsides: The Age of Fighting Sail, 1775-1815 by Nathan Miller. Submitted by Alan Montro: “One of the book’s most memorable scenes is the day when Nelson first went on board a warship at the age of 12. As Miller tells of the rousing battles to follow, they are not just scattered outbursts of action around the world; each takes on strategic meaning in relation to the others. This book is much better written than the typical history. Miller was a World War II sailor and has written a series of other naval histories; he knows both the subject and the lingo. His fluent narrative is founded on solid research. I recommend it as a companion volume to the works of O’Brian and C.S. Forester. It fully deserves five stars. “
  • Cape Horn: The Logical Route by Bernard Moitessier. Submitted by Andrew Bray: “Any sailing library would be incomplete without (this) classic.”
  • Sailing to the Reefs by Bernard Moitessier. Submitted by Andrew Bray: “Any sailing library would be incomplete without (this) classic.”
  • The Long Way by Bernard Moitessier. Submitted by Andrew Bray: “Any sailing library would be incomplete without (this) classic.”
  • The Master Mariner: Darken Ship: The Unfinished Novel by Nicholas Monsarrat. Submitted by Mark Baxter: “Mathew Law is cursed to sail the seas forever to atone for an act of cowardice. Over the centuries he has encounters with some of the greatest worst in our seafaring history. The Darken Ship second novel is only a couple of chapters and the outline of what was to be when the author passed away.”
  • The Master Mariner: Running Proud by Nicholas Monsarrat. Submitted by Mark Baxter: “Mathew Law is cursed to sail the seas forever to atone for an act of cowardice. Over the centuries he has encounters with some of the greatest worst in our seafaring history. The Darken Ship second novel is only a couple of chapters and the outline of what was to be when the author passed away.”
  • The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float by Farley Mowat. Submitted by Scott Gordon: “A hilarious book about a certain time in Newfoundland. Unique, escapist and totally funny. Right there with Tristan Jones on the ‘could this really happen?’ scale.”
  • Fatal Storm by Rob Mundle. Submitted by the Alun James: Excerpt from Amazon.com: In 1998, the 115 boats jockeying at the starting line for the annual Sydney-to-Hobart Race had been warned that low-pressure weather systems were conspiring to guarantee a wild and chancy race. Yet few sailors anticipated the ferocity of the storm that descended around two o’clock the next morning, which quickly devolved into the worst sailing disaster in recent memory. Mundle skillfully re-creates from firsthand accounts the stories of bravery, luck, and folly that left a handful of sailors convinced they’d never go near the Hobart again.

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  • The Last Grain Race by Eric Newby. Submitted by Kurt Hoehne: “Story of the greenhorn author’s adventure on one of the last big commercial square-rigger voyages on the eve of WWII. Really good read.”
  • Recent Advances and Issues in Oceanography by C. Reid Nichols. Submitted by Nick Creilos: “This volume presents the people, technology, and discoveries that mark the highlights of oceanography. I found the first few chapters quite enlightening with regard to the current “state of the art” in ocean sciences. The additional chapters that describe the lives of prominent ocean scientists, organizations, references, web sites, and speeches will serve as an outstanding “ready reference” for those actually practicing ocean science as well as those working toward becoming ocean scientists. “
  • One Watch at a Time: Around the World with Drum on the Whitbread Race by Skip Novak.
  • Maxi – The Ultimate Racing Experience by Preben Nyeland. Submitted by Benny Nelson: “Describes the structure of the world’s biggest racing yachts, looks at thirty top maxi boats, describes their short- and long-distance races, and provides a behind-the-scenes tour of life among their crew. “

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  • Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the first of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Post Captain by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the second of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • H.M.S. Surprise by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the third of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Mauritius Command by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fourth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Desolation Island by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fifth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Fortune of War by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the sixth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Surgeon’s Mate by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the seventh of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Ionian Mission by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the eighth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Treason’s Harbour by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the ninth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Far Side of the World by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the tenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Reverse of the Medal by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the eleventh of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Letter of Marque by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the twelth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Thirteen-Gun Salute by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the thirteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Nutmeg of Consolation by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fourteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Truelove by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the fifteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Wine-Dark Sea by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the sixteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Commodore by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the seventeenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Yellow Admiral by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the eighteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • The Hundred Days by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the nineteenth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Blue at the Mizzen by Patrick O’Brian (the Aubrey-Maturin Series). Submitted by D. McKirahan: “This is the twentieth of O’Brian’s 20 novels, ideally read in “correct sequence” following the history as it unfolds, though each novel stands on its own. The stories are set in the early 19th century, during the Napoleonic Wars, featuring the naval officer Jack Aubrey and his friend and ship’s surgeon Stephen Maturin. Probably the most literary of the many fine writers in the current golden era of nautical fiction, O’Brian’s 20 volumes are full of action, set in historically correct context, with tons of naval lore and naval language.”
  • Yachtsman’s Legal Guide To Co-ownership by Dexter and Paula Odin. Submitted by Chris Allen
  • Sailing Grace: A True Story of Death, Life, and the Sea by John Otterbacher. Submitted by Regan Weaver: “‘Sailing Grace’ is the author’s account of drowning in heart disease, fighting back to the surface, and sailing on. It begins with him flat on his back in a local health club and ends 31 months later and 4000 miles later when he and his family maneuver their sailboat, Grace, to Schull Harbor, Ireland. This book is much more than a simple recounting of travels or of heart problems. ‘Sailing Grace’ is a love story about a man and his family. It’s a tale of obstacles overcome and the determination to live life to the fullest even as he stares death in the eyes. Cardiac patients and anyone else affected by heart disease should read this book because it is a beautiful account of the bravery and courage that is necessary to forge on despite risk. And every sailor should read this book because it is also a well written blue water tale.”

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  • Life and Times of Horatio Hornblower by C.N. Parkinson. Submitted by Al Schreitmueller
  • Tall Ships Down by Daniel S. Parrott. Submitted by John Crawford
  • Temple to the Wind by Christopher Pastore. Submitted by Alex Arnold: “To the wealth of new books on Captain Nat one should add Christopher Pastore’s “Temple to the Wind.” Not only is this a brief biography of the great man but also a parallel look at Sir Thomas Lipton not to mention Iselin, Barr and Dunraven. The book culminates with Reliance: Shamrock III in 1903. The blow by blow accounts of the 1899, 1901 and 1903 matches are great. I found myself sitting there reading this book with all my coffee table A. C. books spread out around me.”
  • In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex by Nathaniel Philbrick. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “This is the story that inspired Herman Melvilles’s Moby Dick.”
  • Sea of Glory by Nat Philbrick. Submitted by Tad Gillespie: “In this new work, Nat Philbrick charts the 1838 – 1842 exploration of the Pacific Ocean by the United States South Seas Exploring Expedition. Headed by the controversial Charles Wilkes and consisting of six sailing vessels and 346 men, it represented one of the largest voyages of discovery in the history of the Western world. The Expedition’s scientists brought back more specimens and artifacts than all three of James Cook’s voyages combined, including 2,000 new species that would become the foundation of the scientific collections of the Smithsonian Institution. Nat relates what happened on the voyage of the Ex. Ex., what went wrong, and why many of us have never heard of this epic voyage and tale. It is a remarkable story – even more so because it has been forgotten for so long.”
  • The Boy, Me, and the Cat by Henry Plummer. Submitted by Wells M. Pile: “A marvelous read about ‘cruising’ south on the intracoastal waterway in 1912-1913 in a 24′ cat boat. Reprinted a few years ago, the origonal edition was very small, mimeographed and bound with fishing line.”
  • Ramage by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the first of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, the young lieutenant takes up special orders direct from Nelson himself which bring news of a mission close to his own heart. In a daring foray, under the very nose of the French Mediterranean fleet, Ramage is to sail his tiny cutter close in to the Italian shore and rescue a party of stranded aristocrats from Napoleon’s fast-advancing army.”
  • Ramage & the Drumbeat by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #2 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Lieutenant Lord Ramage is ordered to proceed to Gibraltar-with all possible dispatch-aboard His Majesty’s ship Kathleen, to support Nelson in a battle with the Spanish off Cape Trafalgar.”
  • Ramage & the Freebooters by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #3 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage, is given command of the Triton with orders to deliver a warning to three offshore fleets that the fleet in homeport has mutinied. His first job is to get the Triton under way and he comes up with a surprise to get the mutinous Triton’s out of port. Even then he still has to hold the crew together and build their loyalty. Then upon arriving in the West Indies, he is given a mission and set up by his admiral to take a fall and must gamble against the odds to be successful.”
  • Governor Ramage RN by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #4 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Lieutenant Lord Ramage, in command of the Triton Brig, is escorting a convoy from Barbados to Jamaica, normally a routine and tedious chore. But this time Ramage has to be especially vigilant to guard the convoy’s precious cargo-a family of important French refugees. With the dreaded Admiral Goddard threatening a continued vendetta against him, Ramage must not fail.”
  • Ramage’s Prize by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #5 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, the West Indian bases are desperate: Post vessels-a vital communications link between England and the West Indies in the war against France-are mysteriously disappearing and no packets have arrived with orders in months. Were the privateers out in full force again? Had Napoleon’s navy a secret new weapon? Lieutenant Lord Nicholas Ramage sets out from Jamaica to discover what treachery is threatening to throw the British navy into chaos. But what he finds is totally unexpected . . ..”
  • Ramage & the Guillotine by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #6 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, just across the English Channel, Napoleon’s seemingly invincible army has massed in a great invasion flotilla. England’s sea forces, under Lord Admiral Nelson, are all but paralyzed-not knowing the size, strength, or time of the foreign onslaught. In a brilliant yet daring spy scheme to protect Britain’s shores, Lieutenant Lord Nicholas Ramage is chosen to plumb the secrets of the French High Command. The penalty for failure is the guillotine.”
  • Ramage’s Diamond by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #7 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, as the youngest captain in His Majesty’s Navy, with a reputation for landing impossible assignments, Lord Ramage is dispatched to the Caribbean islands of Martinique and Diamond Rock. The mission seems humdrum: barricade the French within Fort Royal. But sent to sea in the Juno with a crew grown restless and undisciplined under the prior command of a drunk, Ramage realizes his vessel may not be up to battle with the French.”
  • Ramage’s Mutiny by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #8 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, the vicious mutineers aboard the British ship Jocasta had surrendered their vessel to Spain. Sailing aboard the frigate Calypso, Captain Lord Ramage receives Admiralty orders to recover her by any means. The Jocasta is held in the heavily fortified Spanish port of Santa Cruz, but Ramage will stop at nothing to defy the odds and cut out the imprisoned vessel-even if it means inciting another ‘mutiny’ on board his own ship.”
  • Ramage & the Rebels by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #9 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, there is a sinking British ship, her crew and passengers, men and women alike, ruthlessly murdered at the hands of a French privateer. . . . This is the nightmare Ramage and the crew of the Calypso stumble upon while engaged in a sweep for freebooters in the waters off Jamaica. Supported by his men in a thirst for righteous vengeance, Ramage sets sail to bring the murderers to justice.”
  • The Ramage Touch by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #10 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Post Captain Ramage is back in the Mediterranean, where he first took a command, prowling the Tuscan coast and far from English aid when he encounters a daunting French invasion fleet. As the enemy gathers strength, Ramage must decide how to thwart her actions with only the frigate Calypso and a pair of bomb ketches, prizes of combat but clumsy at best. With Frenchmen on every side, can the vessels and crew at hand answer his orders?”
  • Ramage’s Signal by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #11 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage’s Signal follows the crew of the Calypso further into the French-dominated waters of the Mediterranean on Admiralty orders to sink, burn and destroy. Aiming to confuse and distract the enemy, Ramage and his men find themselves isolated and outnumbered as they take on the might of Napoleon’s fleet.”
  • Ramage & the Renegades by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #12 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, with the Treaty of Amiens signed, hostilities have ceased – at least on paper. Nelson’s crews are standing down and Ramage is on leave when he receives covert Admiralty orders to inspect the small island of Trinidade off the coast of Brazil. Reaching South American shores, Ramage and the crew of the Calypso fetch up in a battle to free several captive merchant ships – and a beautiful woman passenger – as they cross swords with bloodthirsty pirates.”
  • Ramage’s Devil by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #13 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, while on holiday, ashore with his new wife at a chateau in France, Captain Lord Ramage finds the honeymoon interrupted by an end to the Peace of Amiens – and a return to war which will last over a decade. Finding themselves on unfriendly soil just hours before hostilities commence, Ramage and Sarah elude the grasp of Napoleon’s secret police, seeking to close upon all the Brits and French Royalists they can find. Even as they escape, their host is captured and deported to the notorious penal colony on Devil’s Island. Ultimately, back at the helm of the Calypso and among old friends, Ramage finds himself heading in the same direction. But given the Island’s impregnable reputation, can he pull off a rescue?”
  • Ramage’s Trial by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #14 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, a convoy back to England and its plodding operations overseen by Ramage is torn by a bizarre meet with another British frigate. Although newly married, Ramage struggles with an infatuation with a lady of the convoy. After a case of mutiny, Ramage is court martialed for his life, with an infuriatingly biased judge guiding his fate. Throughout there overhangs the disturbing worry that Ramage’s bride (of the previous novel Ramage’s Devil) has been lost at sea.”
  • Ramage’s Challenge by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #15 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Captain Lord Ramage is faced with new orders returning him to the Mediterranean, the site of his first command. Since the outbreak of fresh hostilities between Britain and France, Admiralty spies have been hunting for British officers and allies trapped on the mainland, among them Ramage’s first love, Gianna, the Marchesa di Volterra. Still grieving over the disappearance of his wife, Sarah, Ramage must lead the daring crew of the Calypso into enemy waters, venture deep inland where Napoleon’s invincible armies wait, locate the hostages, and – against all odds – bring them to safety!”
  • Ramage at Trafalgar by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #16 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage is finally reunited with his beloved Sarah and hopes to spend at least a few quiet weeks with her. Instead, Ramage is summoned by Admiral Nelson himself and sent to join the British fleet in blockade duty off Cadiz. His orders: to join Nelson’s fleet blockading the combined French and Spanish navies in the port of Cadiz. However, Nelson does not plan on merely sitting idly by, blockading the enemy’s fleet. He intends to confront it head-on in the biggest naval battle the world has ever seen.”
  • Ramage & the Saracens by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is #17 of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Ramage and the Calypso are ordered to Naples after the battle of Trafalgar and given fresh orders. The Barbary Coast pirates – the Saracens – are active in Sicily again, and terrorizing fishing ports. Ramage and his crew are sent to Sicily to track done the Saracins before they can attack another town.”
  • Ramage & the Dido by Dudley Pope (The Lord Ramage Novels). Submitted by Peter Ilgenfritz: “This is the last of Pope’s 18 novels with Nicholas Ramage as the lead character. For those that found the Patrick O’Brian books should enjoy this series as well. In this book, Captain Lord Ramage has only just arrived home when he receives new orders: he is to commission and take command of the Dido, a massive seventy-four-gun ship! Accompanied by the courageous crew of the Calypso, Ramage is bound for the West Indies, where he must face the challenges of commanding such a massive weapon of war.”


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  • Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome. Submitted by Edward Fryer: “(Great) for children.”
  • The Story of The America’s Cup 1851-2000 by Ranulf Rayner, paintings by Tim Thompson. Submitted by Robert Johnston: “For every race, this complete history gives a straightforward blow-by-blow account, drawings and specifications on the competitors, a reproduction of an oil painting by Thompson of a critical moment, plus a history of courses and venues. The most comprehensive and readable reference I have found for the Cup races.”
  • Cape Horn by Felix Riesenberg. Submitted by Robert Johnston: “The history of the Cape Horn region, including the Straits of Magellan, from the days of the first discovers, through the glorious age of sail, to the present time; recounting the exploits of Magellan, Drake, Schouten, Fitzroy, Darwin, Melville, and many others, including the author’s own experiences. A Lord of the Rings of sailing books.”
  • Keelhauled: Unsportsmanlike Conduct and the America’s Cup by Doug Riggs. Submitted by Chris Allen
  • Survive the Savage Sea by Dougal Robertson. Submitted by Jack Griffin: “True story of Dougal Roberston and his family in a dinghy in the Pacific for 37 days after their 43 foot schooner was attacked by killer whales and sank in 60 seconds. Turtle blood cocktail anyone?”
  • 10,000 Leagues Over The Sea by William Albert Robinson. Submitted by Bob Bailey: “His circumnavigation in the ’30s aboard his ‘Svaap.’ He is one of the few early small boat ocean pioneers.”
  • Always a Distant Anchorage by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “A number of people have written about sailing around the world, but few writers capture the essence of this wonderful experience as well as Hal Roth. He has a keen ability to observe people and places, and Roth’s fine writing illuminates his worldview as he guides you at sea and ashore. Reading this book, along with his new book ‘How to Sail Around the World,’ will show you why Hal and Margaret Roth are an inspiration to many of us who plan to sail over the next horizon.”
  • Chasing the Long Rainbow: The Drama of a Singlehanded Sailing Race Around the World by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “Before the advent of the extreme ocean racers, such as the Open 60 class, single-handed around-the-world races were sailed in yachts which were not too different from those sailed by ‘ordinary sailors.’ In 1986 Roth sailed his 50 ft. yacht American Flag from Newport to Newport in the BOC single-handed ‘round the world race. Roth’s story is an exciting tale of his personal challenges and that of others in this daunting race. His vivid writing puts you aboard in calms and the storms of the Southern Ocean, and you will share the roller coaster of emotions experienced by lone sailors in this extreme environment. You don’t have to sail or know about yacht racing to enjoy this exciting book, but if you do sail, you’ll learn much by going along on Roth’s thrilling adventure. (To see how single-handed yacht racing has changed after only 15 years, read Ellen MacArthur’s Taking on the World.)”
  • How to Sail Around the World : Advice and Ideas for Voyaging Under Sail by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “Hal Roth’s most recent book (2004) is an excellent addition to the list of ‘how-to’ books about long-range cruising under sail. I believe that this book is the best reference now available for prospective and current sailors who wish to expand their horizons. Studying the carefully-researched information and advice tested during Roth’s more than 200,000 sea miles will help the reader make sensible, safe, and economical decisions for all aspects of the cruising life. This well-written book has many photographs and drawings to enhance the detailed text. A good companion book to this one is Roth’s ‘Always a Distant Anchorage.’ Read these two books and you will be ready to cut the dock lines.”
  • We Followed Odysseus by Hal Roth. Submitted by Priscilla Travis: “The fabled history of the Greek Isles has attracted readers afloat and ashore for centuries. Follow in the wake of Odysseus as Hal and Margaret Roth explore the Greek Islands of today, and enjoy the places and people as seen through the observant eyes of this highly experienced cruising couple. Roth’s writing is always engaging, articulate, and well informed, and this book will be enjoyed by all who love distant lands, history, and people.”
  • After the Storm by John Rousmaniere. Submitted by Charles J. Doane: “It is an incredibly well researched exploration of storms at sea and their impact on sailors and human society that eschews the sensational and focuses instead on much more profound issues.”
  • Fastnet, Force 10: The Deadliest Storm in the History of Modern Sailing by John Rousmaniere. Submitted by JJ Isler

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  • Tactics and Strategy in Yacht Racing by Joachim Schult. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “‘Sailing is more than just a hobby.’ says the preface. The book explores the vast number of tactics which every racing man can use, either to defend himself effectively or else to take full advantage of every opportunity he has to attack. Much like a book on chess openings, this book lays out the positions and the preferred tactics to be used in that position. Very good read.”
  • The Shipkiller by Justin Scott. Submitted by Manfred C. Schreiber, Germany: “What a story! An Atlantic Crossing, a rundown by a big tanker, a surviver who hunts the big ship with a SWAN around the globe. Fill in a little Mossad and some strange locations as well as Solent waters and River Rhein and you have to try to find this one to read.”
  • South: A Memoir of the Endurance Voyage by Ernest Shackelton. Submitted by Bill Tripp: “The most remarkable true story of sailing and survival, told in grand matter of fact fashion by a man who lead a company of 26 men stranded in the Antarctic Ice Flow, as it first crushes their ship, and then breaks up. His story of fighting for them and leading them in open boats across the southern Ocean will resonate with anyone who has made a landfall or sailed through the worst. Stepping off the broken ice flow into open boats at 65 degrees S, and bringing 26 men home matches Odysseus’s journey, and it happened.”
  • North to the Night by Alvah Simon. Submitted by Kurt Hoehne: “Story of how the author sailed North just about as far as you can go and wintered in the ice. One of those strangely captivating ‘why on earth would he do that’ reads — polar bears, blindness, existential philosophy, you name it.”
  • Sailing Alone Around the World by Joshua Slocum. Submitted by JJ Isler
  • Across The Western Ocean by Bill Snaith. Submitted by Eric Camiel: “An account of a Trans Atlantic Race and a Trans Atlantic delivery. He writes beautifully and with passion. On local races, while we kids barely held on, Bill had the energy to spend his 4 to 8 off watch writing in his bunk. It’s striking how different things were then compared to this years Trans Atlantic. We forget that they didn’t know with any precision where they were much of the time, got minimal weather forecasts, had no radar and no modern clothes. It was a whole different game.”
  • On The Wind’s Way by Bill Snaith. Submitted by Morton Weintraub: “A recounting of a transatlantic race and much more. If any man deserved the sobriquet ‘renaissance man,’ it was Snaith. I envy anybody reading this wonderful book for the first time.”
  • Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time by Dava Sobel. Submitted by Jack Griffin
  • Heart of Glass: Fiberglass Boats and the Men Who Built Them by Daniel Spurr. Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “If you want to know the amazing story of how pleasure boating got to where it is now, start with Heart of Glass. Dan Spurr tells how, beginning in the 1940s, fiberglass replaced oak as the structural core of a modern sailing vessel. In 137 handsomely written profiles of the men and companies that produced the Hobies, Tartans, Pearsons, C&Cs, and the J classes (among many other boats), he explains how this revolution came about in a business whose finances usually were as ramshackle as the building sheds. You may well find your boat here. You’ll surely be entertained by Spurr’s stories of explosive experiments with volatile materials and big egos.”
  • All This and Sailing, Too: An Autobiograph by Olin J. Stephens. Submitted by Jon Guth: “This is a charming and insightful autobiography by the living legend of 20th century yacht design. It is beautifully produced with many glorious photographs and illustrations.”
  • Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “Stevenson wrote this for his 12 year old stepson. Enjoyable for all ages.”

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  • Cochrane : Britannia’s last sea-king by Donald Thomas. Submitted by Bruce Kirby: “Capt. Thomas Cochrane was this most extraordinary seaman, whose arch enemy Napoleon described as the Sea Wolf, and ‘the greatest fighting sea captain.’ If you liked the Russell Crowe movie or the O’Brian novels, you will love these biographies of The Real Man.”
  • The Lawson History of the America’s Cup by Winfield M. Thompson, Thomas W. Lawson. Submitted by John Drayton: “Collectable, antique tome; original 1901 edition may be hard, if not impossible to find, but the 1986 re-print is available second hand. This is a huge tome that looks good as coffee table fodder, but is also surprisingly easy to read, and regarded by many as the definitive history of the America’s Cup through 1900. Includes a great description/explanation of why Queen Victoria was unusually deferential when she toured the yacht America after it’s victory (the American’s weren’t her subjects, and she was effectively a guest of a foreign country when she came aboard).”
  • The Strange Last Voyage of Donald Crowhurst by Nicholas Tomalin and Ron Hall. Submitted by Peter Dodds: “A true story of singlehanded sailing’s strangest occurrence. Crowhurst creates a phony log showing fantastic accomplishments while he languishes around the Atlantic before apparently committing suicide by jumping overboard and watching his trimaran sail away.”
  • Fifty South To Fifty South by Warwick M. Tompkins. Submitted by Dave Ellis: “The account of the Wander Bird’s sojourn around Cape Horn in 1936.”
  • Dinghy Team Racing by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading (also see “Sail, Race and Win” and “Start to Win”).”
  • Sail, Race and Win by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading. (also see “Dinghy Team Racing” and “Start to Win”).”
  • Start to Win by Eric Twiname. Submitted by R. Geoffrey Newbury: “Besides the usual sailing instruction text, (this book) also has an emphasis on the mental aspects and tactical aspects of sailing, racing and winning. Now long out of print but well worth reading. (also see “Dinghy Team Racing” and “Sail, Race and Win”).”
  • Before the Wind: The Memoir of an American Sea Captain by Charles Tyng (Viking). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Memoir of life at sea from 1808 to 1833 by an engaging writer who shipped out as a 13 year old boy and went on to become Captain and owner of ships that sailed around the world. Fascinating accounts of adventures including several in which the author cheated death by wits or luck.”


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  • Sex, Lies & Spinnakers by Steve Van Slyke. Submitted by Amazon: “Novice sailors Vivian and Mitch Sanford are on the adventure of a lifetime with their longtime friends experienced cruisers Jill and Henry Fullerton, sailing their two boats down the U.S. West Coast to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico and on to the Marquesas Islands in French Polynesia. When Jill and Henry are murdered in Puerto Vallarta the evidence points to robbery and a pair of Mexican fishermen. While the fishermen await trial, sailboats are allowed to leave for foreign ports. Too late a missing journal convinces Mitch the fishermen are innocent. The real murderer is sailing away to paradise. He and Vivian have a decision to make: are they capable of crossing the Pacific Ocean and bringing their friends’ killer to justice? This sexy, action-packed sea adventure takes you on a roller coaster ride that never lets up.”
  • On The Wind’s Highway by Harold S.Vanderbilt. Submitted by Ned Hall: “When I was growing up, my brothers Eric, Ben and I read and re-read with fascination and hero worship. (It) is a wonderfully told and written perspective on the golden days of the America’s Cup. It has some beautiful pictures along with well-told stories of the races, boats and people, including our designer of the ages, Olin Stephens. Not to be missed is the story of Rod Stephens saving Ranger and his hairy ride to the masthead on another exciting day. It is sometimes nice to drop back to this period to give us some perspective on today’s America’s Cup Races and antics.”
  • Oceanography and Seamanship by William G. Van Dorn. Submitted by John Rousmaniere: “(commenting on a Scuttlebutt thread on rogue waves) Rogues don’t have to be immense 80-footers, just unusually high and nasty in comparison with the surrounding sea state. And there are plenty of them: in this text book, William G. Van Dorn estimated that one deep-water wave out of 20 is a rogue. One cause is a collision of nonparallel waves, some running at one angle due to the local wind, others running at another angle from a storm many miles beyond the horizon.”
  • Captain James Cook by Alan Villiers (Scribner’s). Submitted by Bill Wheary: “The definitive biography of perhaps the greatest maritime explorer by perhaps the last great square rigged Captain.”
  • Falmouth for orders; the story of the last clipper ship race around Cape Horn by Alan Villiers. Submitted by Bill Wheary: “Accounts of life on the Windjammers in the last days of sail.”
  • Last of the Wind Ships by Alan Villars. Submitted by Dan Nerney: “This coffee table book is filled with beautiful black and white photos by Alan Villiers with extracts from several of his books as captions to the remarkable photos taken aboard the last of the great full rigged sailing ships. Villiers, born in Australia in 1903, carried a camera and pen (but no typewriter) in his sea bag when he sailed as a deckhand on some of the worlds most famous sailing ships in the 20s and 30s – the Cape Horners, Herzogen Cecile, Grace Harwar and Parma. He went to sea at 15 but his career ended several years later when he was severely injured aboard one of these ships. He then turned to writing and authored the book “By Way of Cape Horn” and “To Falmouth for Orders” As a photographer, he was unique – a forefather to today’s marine photographers, He made films and was with Dr Basil Greenhill (who wrote the introductory text), one of the founders of photographic archive of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England. It is easy to romanticize about going to sea in the early 20th century but the photos in this book show the difficult life of the seamen and women (usually only Captain’s wives) aboard these ships which ended with the sinking of the Killoran in 1940 by a Nazi U-boat.”

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  • Winning: The Psychology of Competition by Stuart H. Walker. Submitted by Tom Price: “The best of Stu Walker’s books. Any advanced racer will tell you that the best thing he can do to improve his game is to unlock the mental aspect of winning and losing. Stuart writes in a looser style than his more technical books and uses examples from winners (and losers) in many sports.”
  • The Battle of the Atlantic by Andrew Williams. Submitted by Pedro Ribeiro da Cunha
  • Square Rigger Round the Horn; the Making of a Sailor by C. Ray Wilmore. Submitted by Ed Cesare: “It is the true story of Mr. Wilmore and chum’s signing on to a passage from Philadelphia to Honolulu in the latter but not depressingly latest days of sail.”
  • The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk. Submitted by Bill Schoenberg: “Everyone has had at least one Captain Queeg in their life.”

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